Bulletin Board v238

Campus Health does not offer equal support for male survivors — The University knows it can’t provide identical services for male and female survivors of sexual violence. But instead of providing equal resources for both groups, Counseling and Psychological Services has largely pushed the needs of male survivors off campus. There is only enough interest to run one sexual assault survivor group on campus, which is open to female-identified survivors.

The CDC’s Rape Numbers Are Misleading — “CDC: Nearly 1 in 5 Women Raped.” “One in Five U.S. Women Has Been Raped: CDC Survey.” These alarming headlines were typical of the coverage of last week’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report on sexual and intimate violence in the United States. The CDC study—the second in two years—seems to support a radical feminist narrative that has been gaining mainstream attention recently: that modern America is a “rape culture” saturated with misogynistic violence.

Men’s helpline gets 25,000 calls over four months — SIF, the mobile app launched five months ago for the protection of men’s rights, has received a mega response in the last four months. The app, launched by Save India Family Foundation NGO, has received 25,000 calls in the last four-five months. It was launched to help men at the receiving end of domestic violence or slapped with false rape cases with a dedicated helpline “08882498498”. Continue reading

Bulletin Board v237

Breaking the stigma surrounding male rape — South Africa’s rape statistics are among the highest in the world. Most interventions to reduce these figures focus on female survivors. Matrix Men, an organisation that supports male rape survivors, says the stigma surrounding this crime makes it difficult to obtain reliable statistics. Activists believe as many as one in six men will in their lifetime suffer sexual abuse – and say men should start talking about it.

Ex-Big Brothers volunteer seeks to overturn sex abuse conviction — The judge who heard the child sexual abuse case against a McHenry County Big Brothers volunteer should not have allowed testimony alleging the man committed inappropriate acts decades ago, his attorney argued Thursday in appellate court. Attorney Doug Johnson asked a 2nd District appeals panel in Elgin to throw out the conviction of Leonard Puccini, 54, a Bull Valley man who was found guilty last year of sexually abusing a 12-year-old boy in 2009 whom he was mentoring through the Big Brothers.

‘I was raped at age 14 but told nobody for 28 years’ says client of new men’s counselling group — A FATHER-of-two has told of the difference a new rape counselling service specifically for men could make for victims. Upper Heyford-based Clean Slate launched its Adult Rape Outreach Service (AMOS) and Talking Young Men service (TYM) on Monday, with the help of £9,500 National Lottery funding. AMOS will provide counselling, help and advice to men over 16 and TYM will offer the same service to boys between age nine and 16. Continue reading

Bulletin Board v235

Callum Carson bravely breaks a social taboo by openly talking about being the victim of male rape — SCOTLAND has witnessed a steep increase in the number of rapes reported to police. But while this crime is often viewed as an attack on women, there are male victims too. It is rare for anyone to publicly share their experience of rape – particularly a man. Callum Carson, from Bathgate, waived his right to anonymity to share his story in a bid to raise the issue of male rape and highlight a system that he feels let him down.

Charge: Self-styled swim coach molested gravely ill boy at Seattle Children’s hospital — An Idaho man accused of sexually assaulting a seriously ill boy at Seattle Children’s hospital now faces a child molestation charge. A self-styled swim coach, John Hudspeth was caught by Children’s staff molesting the boy while he was being treated at the hospital, King County prosecutors say in charging papers. Hudspeth, a 63-year-old resident of St. Maries, Idaho, is alleged to have spent years grooming the boy for abuse prior to the sexual assaults.

Coventry rape centre launches counselling service for men — Coventry Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre has launched a counselling service for men. The project will provide specialist counselling to men who have experienced any form of rape or sexual abuse at any point in their lives. It will also help fathers and adult male siblings of abused children. CRASAC already supports younger males from the ages of five to 18, but in the past, there was no provision for adult men. Continue reading

Bulletin Board v233

After Completing A 12-Year Sentence, A Texas Man Is Cleared By DNA — There aren’t many cheery occasions in criminal courts. But on Friday morning, Judge Gracie Lewis’ courtroom in Dallas, Tex., was packed with reporters, well-wishers and other exonerated men. And joy filled the room. Craig Watkins, the district attorney of Dallas County, walked over to where Michael Phillips sat in his wheelchair and apologized for the state of Texas.

Ban on male child carers considered after ‘horrific’ abuse case — The South Australian government is prepared to consider radical laws, including banning men from working as child carers, after a carer was accused of horrific child sex abuse. A 32-year-old Adelaide man employed by Families SA has been charged with seven counts of unlawful sexual intercourse with young children under his watch at a residential care facility.

Boy, 8, to mom: ‘You’re going to kill me,’ LMPD report says — An 8-year-old boy told his mother, “You’re going to kill me,” as she allegedly strangled him with a rope. That’s what a Louisville Metro Police arrest report said after the arrest of Kimberly Anderson, 40, for attempted murder and criminal abuse. On the afternoon of July 22, officers were dispatched to the 6900 block of Rock Hollow Drive after Anderson called police, saying she strangled the little boy. Anderson told officers she contemplated killing the victim with a knife or a rope, but finally decided on the rope because he would “just pass out,” the report said. Continue reading

Bulletin Board v231

Alleged victim tells court of abuse by five different paedophiles in youth — An elderly Dublin man has gone on trial accused of sexually abusing a boy and paying him money in a flat over thirty years ago. The alleged victim told a jury today that he was abused by five different paedophiles during his youth, including the accused. The accused man (73) has pleaded not guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to indecently assaulting the male, who was aged between 11 and 13 years old, on dates from October 1983 to June 1985.

Boy Found in Basement Alleges Long-Term Abuse by Parents — When a 12-year-old Detroit boy went missing on June 14 and was found 11 days later, it should have been a day to rejoice. Instead, his discovery in the family’s basement has turned into weeks of unanswered questions, with some unsettling information about what the child’s life may have been like.

Defence taskforce finds appalling abuse — TEENAGE recruit Graham’s life was ruined on the night he was raped twice at a West Australian naval training base and he’s lived with the trauma ever since. THE appalling abuse of Graham and other junior sailors as young as 15 was all too common at HMAS Leeuwin, the Defence Abuse Response Taskforce (DART) says. Their stories could now be referred to the ongoing royal commission into child sex abuse, with many parallels to the effects of abuse by pedophile priests and others emerging from the hearings. Continue reading

False accusations and Title IX

Originally posted on April 27, 2013

Feminists have a sordid response to false accusations. While some will admit that they occur, most feminists seem opposed to considering them a serious problem. When presented with examples of false accusations resulting in arrests, public humiliation, imprisonment, and even death, many feminists treat those as outliers. Nothing to be concerned with, nothing to focus on. Instead, those feminists accuse advocates for the falsely accused of supporting and excusing rape.

This was the response to men’s rights activists when they opposed a recent change to Title IX that allowed for easier prosecution of students accused of sexual assault. The Obama administration changed the language of the law so that colleges need only rely on a “preponderance of evidence” to expel a student for sexual assault. This is the same standard used in civil court cases, and only requires the accuser to show that it is more likely than not — essentially that it is possible — the accused committed the act.

This set off a wave of complaints about the law violating due process rights. Yet, few of those complaints came from feminists. Feminists tended to support the change as it would result in more punishment for those accused of rape.

However, there is a problem: what if the accusation is false? What if it is malicious? And what if one of those feminists who supports such changes to the law found her son falsely accused of rape? Judith Grossman recently found out the answers to those questions:  Continue reading

Post-Conviction DNA Testing and Wrongful Conviction

Originally posted on March 4, 2013

Over on Feminist Critics, Clarence linked to a piece The Spearhead featured concerning the wrongful conviction rate in homicide and sexual assault cases. The Post-Conviction DNA Testing and Wrongful Conviction report reviews sexual assault cases from from 1973 to 1987 in Virgina. The report found that between 8 to 15 percent of sexual assault cases resulted in wrongful convictions:

DNA testing produced a determinate outcome for 230 of these cases, in which there were 250 convicted offenders. In 56 of those convictions the convicted offender was eliminated as the source of DNA evidence, and for 38 convictions that elimination supported exoneration. Thus, we find that in Virginia cases resulting in a convicted offender between 1973 and 1987 where evidence was retained in an unbiased sample of 715 homicides and sexual assault convictions—

  • The convicted offender is eliminated as a contributor for a probative evidence item in 8 percent (n=56) of convictions.8
  • The convicted offender is eliminated as a contributor for a probative evidence item, and that elimination is supportive of exoneration, in 5 percent (n=38) of convictions.

For nonsexual assault homicide cases, a determinate finding about a convicted offender being a source of a DNA profile was reached in only 23 out of 293 convictions (8 percent), making it too rare to make declarative statements about the likelihood of potential wrongful conviction in those homicide convictions.

We find that DNA testing of items in these cases leads to a determinate conclusion in more than half of the sexual assault convictions (including homicides with a sexual assault). Thus, we focus much of our analysis on the sexual assault offenses. We find that in convictions in Virginia between 1973 and 1987 where evidence was retained in a sample of 422 convictions for sexual assault

  • The convicted offender was eliminated as the source of questioned evidence in 40 out of 422 convictions (9 percent).9
  • The convicted offender was eliminated as the source of questioned evidence in 33 out of 422 convictions (8 percent) and that elimination was supportive of exoneration.
  • The convicted offender was eliminated as the source of questioned evidence in 40 out of 227 convictions (18 percent) where a determination could be made from the DNA analysis.10
  • The convicted offender was eliminated as the source of questioned evidence in 33 out of 227 convictions (15 percent) where a determination could be made from the DNA analysis, and that elimination was supportive of exoneration.

The two most important numbers in the bullets above show the rate at which convicted offenders were eliminated as the source of questioned evidence and that elimination was supportive of exoneration. This occurs for 8 percent of all sexual assault convictions in the sample and for 15 percent of all sexual assault convictions where a determinate finding was made. We note again that additional facts about the case not included in the forensic file may ultimately include the convicted offender. However, given that these are sexual assault cases where the profile was determined to be male and excluded the convicted offender, we anticipate this will be relatively rare. (p. 5-6)

Continue reading