Bulletin Board v241

A new moniker and a criminal pardon allowed predator to fly under police radar — – He ran from his past, but couldn’t escape who he is. Nearly 30 years ago, James Dean Barnett was convicted of sexually assaulting a 10-year-old boy while Barnett volunteered at a London children’s agency. This week, in court in St. Thomas, he sat waiting to be sentenced on four more sex charges against children — three neighbourhood kids, ages eight to 10, and a boy from his past who’s now an adult. But there was a twist: Barnett was now 49-year-old Tyler Giles.

About 14,000 Men In the Military Were Raped Last Year — Almost None Will Report It — Most survivors of rape in the military are men. Men also develop post-traumatic stress disorder from rape at almost twice the rate they do from combat, according to a sobering in-depth report published in GQ last month. The magazine’s in-depth look jump started a long-overdue conversation about an issue the mainstream has long been slow to respond to. The problem? Historically, very few male survivors report their assault, muffling an already egregious epidemic.

At civil trial, a former altar boy disputes Jon David Couzens’ account of priest’s sexual abuse — A former altar boy took the stand Friday and disputed Jon David Couzens’ allegations of sexual abuse by Monsignor Thomas O’Brien three decades ago. Jeff Barlow told Jackson County jurors that Couzens’ claims that O’Brien sexually abused four altar boys, including Barlow, as a group in the early 1980s at Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Church in Independence were false. Continue reading

Grisham and the law

John Grisham waded into a political war-zone when he commented on the conviction of people who possess child pornography. Grisham stated in an interview with the Telegraph:

“We have prisons now filled with guys my age. Sixty-year-old white men in prison who’ve never harmed anybody, would never touch a child,” he said in an exclusive interview to promote his latest novel Gray Mountain which is published next week.

“But they got online one night and started surfing around, probably had too much to drink or whatever, and pushed the wrong buttons, went too far and got into child porn.”

His comments sparked criticism from child advocacy groups. However, Grisham went on to state:

Asked about the argument that viewing child pornography fuelled the industry of abuse needed to create the pictures, Mr Grisham said that current sentencing policies failed to draw a distinction between real-world abusers and those who downloaded content, accidentally or otherwise.

“I have no sympathy for real paedophiles,” he said, “God, please lock those people up. But so many of these guys do not deserve harsh prison sentences, and that’s what they’re getting,” adding sentencing disparities between blacks and whites was likely to be the subject of his next book.

No one paid attention to that part, or this part of the Telegraph article:

Since 2004 average sentences for those who possess – but do not produce – child pornography have nearly doubled in the US, from 54 months in 2004 to 95 months in 2010, according to a 2012 report by the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

However the issue of sex-offender sentencing has sparked some debate in the US legal community after it emerged that in some cases those who viewed child porn online were at risk of receiving harsher sentences than those who committed physical acts against children.

A provocative article in the libertarian magazine Reason headlined “Looking v Touching” argued last February that something was “seriously wrong with a justice system in which people who look at images of child rape can be punished more severely than people who rape children”.

Grisham later issued an apology for his comments. Continue reading

Sexual Exploitation of Boys

Lynne MacDonell spoke to a college audience about sexual violence against men and boys. Her lecture provides an insight to some of the issues that males face when they come forward.

MacDonell makes special note of the currently accepted statistics on sexual violence against men and boys. She mentions that college-age men report nearly the same rate of sexual violence against their female counterparts. She also mentions that more men and boys are coming forward than ever before. That revelation leads her to suspect that more boys are sexually abused than girls.

I am inclined to agree with MacDonell. Males face a host of stigmas that females do not. The desire to blame males for their abuse is much higher. It even exists in the abuse support community. Concepts like “rape culture” engage in victim-blaming men and boys by implying they are complicit in and benefit from the social structures that led to their abuse. Likewise, the support community, particularly organizations run by feminists, treat males not as victims but as potential abusers. Continue reading

Bulletin Board v240

Boy ‘abused just one day after arriving at children’s home in Northern Ireland’ — One of the first boys to enter a children’s home in Northern Ireland has said he was abused by a religious brother the day after he arrived. He claimed he was interfered with while having a shower at Rubane House, Co Down, in 1951, under the guise of “horse play”. Once he went missing, he told a public inquiry, was brought home by police, beaten by members of the Catholic order which ran the home and had his hair shaved off in what he claimed was an act of humiliation.

Boy Scouts staff member accused of sexual abuse — A seasonal staff member with the Boy Scouts of America Cascade Pacific Council is accused of sexually abusing a 16-year-old boy, officials confirmed. Elizabeth Monda-Guthrie, 28, was indicted Oct. 6, 2014 on two counts of second-degree sexual abuse and one count of third-degree sexual abuse. She pleaded not guilty Friday afternoon in Multnomah County Circuit Court.

Could Britain’s prisons soon be as bad as America’s? — Forget jailbreaks, jail is broken. Completely and utterly broken. Some figures for you. The average cost per prisoner per year is around £35,000. This is, famously, more than Eton and more than Oxbridge. The total criminal re-offending rate is about 25%; for criminals released from jail, it’s nearly 50%; for criminals released from jail after prison sentences of less than a year, it’s almost 60%. The UK prison population is currently about 87,700. Continue reading

Bulletin Board v239

Altar boy trial opens in sex abuse case — The Kansas City-St. Joseph Diocese was told repeatedly since the 1970s that Monsignor Thomas O’Brien was a danger to children but failed to prevent him from sexually abusing a former altar boy, his lawyer told jurors Monday. Though no amount of money could make up for what happened to Jon David Couzens, attorney Rebecca Randles said, $10 million in compensatory damages plus punitive damages would be fitting.

British Man Raped at Oktoberfest 2014 by Two Assailants — A British man has been raped at this month’s world famous Oktoberfest in Munich, German police have said. The 24-year-old, who has not been named, was attacked by two men at the edge of the festival area. According to police reports, he was relieving himself in the bushes on the outskirts of the Theresienwiese – a large open space where Oktoberfest takes place each year – when he was approached by a man who “made it clear he wanted to have sex with him”.

‘I became a monster,’ says Scout leader facing prison for sex abuse — In his own words, disgraced Scout leader Scott Stanley said his scheme to molest vulnerable boys in his trust was “shameful and monstrous.” “Who I am hates who I was and what I’ve done,” Stanley told his sentencing hearing in an Ottawa courtroom Thursday in a brief, quickly read statement. Continue reading

I remember Mama

Dr. Edward Rhymes wrote an article for A Voice for Men Mint Press News recounting his childhood experiences of abuse. From the article:

The newness and the ecstasy of having the child she had waited so long for lasted for a little while—just a little while. What followed was a childhood scarred by psychological, emotional, and physical abuse. When I was as young as seven, my mother had introduced me to phrases such as “I hate you,” “I can’t stand you,” and “You make me sick.” Beginning at a tender age, my body was frequently visited with blows from her fists, the backs of her hands, and even her feet. My mother, who was not a small woman, would sometimes knock me to the ground, press her knee into my chest, and pummel me with punch after punch. There were times when family members would have to pull her off me.

Rhymes also detailed the prevalence of female-perpetrated child abuse. He showed that women commit the majority of child abuse, yet most of the outreach and commentary about abuse revolves around preventing men from abusing others. He mentioned Adrian Peterson, the NFL player currently charged with child abuse, and made an observation:

Let’s also consider this: In the wake of the Adrian Peterson child abuse allegations, it was his mother who stepped forward and said Peterson was doing what she raised him to do. My point here isn’t whether one agrees or disagrees with his parenting methods but that the response would have been quite different had Peterson’s father been the one who had come forward and said, “That’s how I reared my son.” Can we honestly say that wouldn’t have been offered up as proof positive of how abusive men are?

No, we cannot. The media and talking heads would have jumped on that admission as evidence of the cycle of abuse. Yet when a woman admits to essentially abusing her child and raising him to do the same to his children, no one takes notice. Instead, it led to questions about whether it was appropriate to spank children.

Rhymes also mentioned another double standard:

There is a great deal of understanding we extend to women and girls who have been abused who then, in turn, engage in inappropriate and abusive behavior. It’s an understanding, however, that abused men and boys, who do likewise, don’t equally enjoy.

A truer statement could not be written.

You’re Not Helping v.25

Feminists have gotten a lot of mileage out of the Ray Rice NFL scandal. To be certain, the NFL’s attempted cover-up is embarrassing. Rice’s assault on his now wife was horrible. However, none of that justifies the baffling response several feminists had when other journalists mention Hope Solo.

For those unaware, Hope Solo is a United States soccer star who assaulted her 17-year-old nephew and her sister. Solo faces fourth-degree misdemeanor charges, yet continues to play while the case is pending. In contrast, Rice was fired by the Ravens and indefinitely suspended from the NFL. Several sports journalists noted the imbalance, which appears to annoy some feminist journalists.

Katie McDonough offered the most recent complaint:

[...] A conversation about whether or not Solo should be on the field right now does not require smug finger wagging about inconsistently applied standards of outrage, it requires a grappling with how sports leagues handle violent offenses. (That’s a far more complicated conversation to have than many of us are willing to concede.) Condemning what Solo is alleged to have done does not require erasing a history in which men have systematically used manipulation and physical violence to dominate, humiliate and kill women. And scrutinizing the top brass within women’s national soccer for their calculus around Solo does not require us to insincerely argue that women’s soccer and men’s football are sports that receive equal attention in the media — that somehow it’s just this one time that the public has fallen silent in an otherwise robust conversation about the women’s national soccer team.

Let us look at the two journalists, Juliet Macur and Cindy Boren, to see what they wrote. Continue reading