You’re not helping v4

Originally posted on February 4, 2011

Early this week the Justice Department released its draft for the regulations to combat prison rape. This comes on the heels of reports from last year about the severity of sexual violence in adult and juvenile prisons. The regulations closely follow the recommendations made by the National Prison Rape Elimination Commission. However, there are still some problems:

The department concluded, for instance, that PREA addresses not just rape but all manner of sexual abuse in correctional facilities – an interpretation resisted by some corrections officials. It calls for the adoption of a zero-tolerance policy for sexual abuse; maintains prohibitions on cross-gender pat and strip searches of juveniles; requires a facility to designate an on-site PREA coordinator; and calls for background checks of prospective corrections officers to screen for past incidents of inmate abuse.

But the department punted on several crucial issues – a particularly frustrating development given that it had the benefit of a thorough and credible report from the commission. The department failed to articulate rules for independent audits of facilities and did not come to any conclusions about how often such audits should take place. (The commission recommendation: every three years.) Such evaluations are crucial in determining whether facilities are complying with the law’s mandate. Perhaps one reason the Justice Department had a hard time with audits is that it also failed to specify what criteria should be used to determine whether an institution is in compliance with the law.

Administration officials argue that the draft regulations are just that – preliminary proposals to be fleshed out once more information is gathered; the department will be accepting public comments for approximately two months. Some delay and duplication are beyond the administration’s control. But it is perturbing that the department has not made more progress in answering these critical questions. Didn’t it miss a congressional deadline in 2010 because of protracted “listening sessions” in which it tilled much of the same ground already worked by the commission? As it now stands, the department will probably not finalize its rules until the end of the year.


The Justice Department’s procrastination may have more to do with the politics governing the prison industry than anything else. Prisons bring in a lot of money, and the industry effectively lobbies for its position. The changes might get made, but it seems more likely that NPREC’s recommendations will get a few more crucial chips knocked out of it before anything passes. On a side note, NPREC’s recommendations focus mostly on female victims despite males making up the majority of those raped in prison. From my skimming of the 300 page document I saw no mention of female-on-male sexual assault, but it might be included in portions of more in-depth commentary. It just seems odd that this was not a focus (although male-on-female sexual assault was) considering that the reports released last year stated that both adult men and juvenile males reported large rates of sexual violence at the hands of female staff.

However, that is not the point of this post. This is:

Prison Rape Reform Heads Up for Anyone Who’s Ever Typed “But Men Get Raped Too” In Comments on a Feminist-Friendly Blog or Forum

Feminist blogger figleaf wrote a post attacking men’s groups using the above news:

One of the few bright spots in the anti-feminist “men’s rights” movement is their frequently-voiced concern about male rape victims. And when they bring it up it’s often in the context of social indifference to male rape in prisons. So you’d think the men’s-rights-o-sphere would be all over this piece of good news about prison rape.

One of the more irritating tendencies many feminists have is the desire to delegitimatize men’s groups. Whenever there is an issue like prison rape that makes the news, feminists are very quick to claim that because no men’s group discussed that particular news report, all men’s groups must be faking concern about the issue. It is a silly tit-for-tat argument meant as retort to men’s groups calling feminists out on feminists ignoring and marginalizing male victims of violence. People should understand that someone not addressing every single news report about an issue they care about does not mean the person’s concern for that issue is disingenuous. Yet, that is the conclusion figleaf draws:

In fact, since the PREA was passed in 2003 and the Justice Department is only just barely getting its foot-dragging ass in gear, you’d think that men’s rights groups would have been all over the DOJ for the last seven years to move more quickly.

Instead it’s been mostly feminist groups doing the actual activism.

That is a claim that I think justifies some support because over the past seven years that I have advocated for male victims I have not seen any support or discussion about any type of sexual violence against males coming from prominent feminist groups, nor have I encountered many feminists engaging in any actual activism on behalf of male victims. Figleaf provides no evidence that only feminist groups advocate for male victims, and that is something I would like to see given that countless non-feminist men and women push rape centers to train volunteers to help male victims, include information for them, and to stop hanging up on or accusing male victims of being rapists. Many of these people push for funding for organizations to help male victims or to change legal statutes and practices so that those who prey on male victims, particularly women, do not want away with slaps on the wrist. These same people write to media outlets that frame sexual violence against boys as “affairs” or “trysts” rather than as rape. Many of them spend time trying to convince prisons, boarding schools, clubs, and religious organizations to address the sexual violence that occurs in their facilities or communities. As male survivor and an advocate I find it insulting for figleaf to give feminists credit for my and other male survivors’ and advocates’ hard work.

She He goes on to write:

It seems to me that if just one out of every 100 men who’s ever typed the words “but men get raped too” in a feminist-friendly comment or forum thread had instead contacted their Congressional representative or the DOJ things might have moved a little faster.

That was nothing more than a rather tactless attack on advocates for male victims. I am rather thick-skinned and I understand that feminists harbor a bias against male victims and their advocates, but all the same I would appreciate, as a member of both groups, that I not get attacked for calling out feminists on their biased framing of sexual violence.

Secondly, figleaf makes a rather gross presumption. A person can take issue with feminists and also advocate for male victims. They can do both at the same time without telling anyone that they are doing that. Figleaf again provides no evidence showing those men never engage in any activism, meaning that all she he did was insult them, and I think is worth noting that many, if not most, of them are rape victims. Such a comment essentially throws that person’s experiences in their face.

Figleaf may object to the criticism, yet feminists positioned themselves as the gatekeepers to sexual violence advocacy. For feminists not to discuss sexual violence against males or treat it as some anomaly unworthy of attention contradicts their claim about wanting to stop all sexual violence. That makes figleaf’s post all the more ironic. She He is calling out a group of people for not addressing a particular news report about an issue they claim they are concerned about (and being rather smug about it) while objecting to people calling feminists out for not addressing a particular issue they claim to be concerned about.

What I find interesting, although unsurprising, is that the post is not about the Prison Rape Elimination Act. Instead, it is an attack on those advocating for reform. That perfectly explains why most male survivors and advocates criticize feminists on this issue. Feminists claim to side with male victims and their advocates, yet feminists insult them and use those men’s experiences  to attack them. Here is a thought: if figleaf really cares about the enforcement of the Prison Rape Elimination Act, she he should write a post about that rather than one attacking male victims and their advocates for not discussing a particular news report.

However, on this point I agree with her him:

If you’re interested in commenting on the proposed rules here’s the DOJ contact information.

What she listed on her site is no longer correct. The current link states that the deadline for making comments is April 4, 2011. I urge anyone concerned with prison rape to first read both reports (yes, it will take some time, but you have three weeks) and then leave a civil comment on the regulations site.

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38 thoughts on “You’re not helping v4

  1. Why does one get the distinct impression that feminists would be very happy if incidents of male rape were never reported?

  2. She goes on to write?” Dude, I joined my first men’s group in 1974.

    There are two problems with the “feminists should care about male rape” argument. First, it’s still the case that more women are victims of sexual assault than men. Maybe not by as wide a margin as some people think but still by a hefty margin. Second, because most perpetrators of sexual assault on men are themselves men there’s not really that much women can do about it.

    That’s doesn’t make it true, as aych suggests, that women (feminist women anyway) don’t care if men get raped. Most men are raped for the same reason women are, and most men who rape men have or will also rape women. (It being a power thing — using sex because sex is a way to humiliate victims and not simply because the rapist is horny — the sex, age, etc. of the victim is often surprisingly irrelevant to a lot of rapists.) Consequently, most feminists aren’t any more keen about rapists who attack men than they are about rapists who attack women. And ignoring male rape would just leave a reservoir of existing and potential assailants.

    Finally, having been the victim of sexual assault and near rape by a woman (when I was extremely young) and very nearly the victim of a male assailant when I was a teenager I’m… pretty edgy about the subject myself. For the record, though, I’ll just point out that the person who clued me in and helped me get set back on my feet about it was… an ardently feminist director of my college town’s women’s shelter and rape-relief center. It was my first year of college and I was in a journalism class. I interviewed her for the school paper and kind of idly joked “of course men can’t be raped.” And she gave me the lowdown — said absolutely you bet they can. And it was like one of those movie scenes where the camera pulls back at 100 miles an hour and I realized holy fucking shit. Took me a couple of years to sort that out.

    Anyway, while I admit I don’t have a lot of patience with angry “men’s rights” groups using feminists as the boogieman any more than I had much patience for the old angry “women’s rights” groups using men the same way back in the 1970s I wasn’t snarking at all about the PREA business. Men’s rights guys really do spend a lot of time arguing that men get raped too. And men’s rights guys really could have and really should have been doing more about it. Because, yeah, women prisoners are roughly twice as likely to be sexually assaulted or raped than men, but since roughly 90% of prisoners are men in absolute terms there are way more male prisoner victims than women. Most of the pressure to pass PREA seems to have come from feminists, but it sure as heck weren’t that many men standing in line in front of them.

    Toysoldier, I’m really happy to hear you’ve been taking it seriously, and working hard to deal with it for as long as you have. That’s really great. I wish there were more men like you who were actually doing something about it instead of just bringing it up whenever women talk about rape… and then dropping it as soon as the conversation stops. That’s been going on since at least the early 1980s (when I first noticed) and it doesn’t seem to have made much difference. So thanks. We need more guys working on this too.

    figleaf

  3. You know my first reaction to this was to notice that this is just another of many many examples of feminists only bringing up men’s groups when they have something to complain about (part of that mud slinging that feminists like to believe they are not participating in).

    But on the other hand neverminding figleaf’s tit for tat action its worth noting that he is at least willing to ante up.

  4. Figleaf, my apologies for confusing your gender. I made the corrections in the post.

    Whether women are more likely to be sexually assaulted than men is irrelevant. More men are victims of violence than women, and by a rather large margin. However, no one advocating for an end of violence could justify not talking about female victims of violence. It is logically, morally, and ethically untenable. Recent information and research suggests that women may actually commit half the sexual violence against males, particularly boys. Yet if one wants to stop all sexual violence, why would any of that matter?

    Perhaps feminists’ opinions about sexual violence against males does not men that feminists do not care about male victims, but certainly gives the appearance that they are antipathetic towards male victims because when asked to address sexual violence against males feminists either refuse to do so or give excuses for why they will not (as you did above). The same holds true for feminists who make unsusbtantiated claims like “most men who rape men have or will also rape women,” something I have not read in any study about sexual violence against males.This also applies to your comments about female inmates. The results of the study state that women are more likely to report sexual assault than men, not that women are more likely to be sexually assaulted. Women reported less frequent assaults, more one-time assaults, and less violent assaults, whereas male inmates reported more gang rapes, more injuries, more instances of staff sexual violence, more instances of assault by different assailants, and less assistance from staff when injured.

    All those comments lead people like aych to assume that feminists are trying to trivialize and marginalize sexual violence against males rather than treat it seriously because there seems no other logical reason for someone to quibble over this issue in that manner.

    While it is good that you got help from a rape center, your individual experience in no way changes that more often than not male victims are turned away by rape centers or accused of being rapists. It happens, whether feminists want to admit it or not.

    As I noted before, you do not provide any evidence that men’s groups do not address sexual violence against men or any evidence that only feminists support PREA. If you have it, I would like to see it. If not, all you are doing is insulting and attacking a group of people for calling feminists out on their hypocrisy, and you are doing so using in a rather petty manner. It would be one thing if none of those groups talked about prison rape outside of bringing it up in feminist spaces. It is another thing entirely if they do not talk about one specific news report.

    I think you need to broaden your circle of associates because many, if not most, of the people involved in advocating for male victims are male, and many of them are victims themselves. Now if we are to talk about wishes, I wish there were more feminists who were actually doing what they claim they do instead of talking about male victims only when some non-feminist brings it up and then dropping them as soon as the conversation ends. More so, I wish there were more feminists who were actually helping male victims rather than making excuses and denying the prevalence of sexual violence against males.

  5. Figleaf, do you know that you are perpetuating misinformation or, at the very least, are unaware of recent research?

    Quoting Toy Soldiers:

    Whether women are more likely to be sexually assaulted than men is irrelevant.

    It’s also not possible to conclude.

    * 2.1% of men reported forced vaginal sex compared to 1.6% of women in a relationship in the previous year. http://pubpages.unh.edu/~mas2/ID45-PR45.pdf
    * 94% of youth in correctional facilities reported being sexually abused by female staff. http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/svjfry09.pdf
    * Among inmates reporting staff sexual misconduct, ~ 65% reported a female aggressor. http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/svpjri0809.pdf
    * 50% of homeless youth reported being sexually abused by a female. http://www.nursing.ubc.ca/PDFs/ItsNotWhatYouThink.pdfAll

    From the report on inmates, here are a few highlights:

    * Female inmates in prison (4.7%) or jail (3.1%) were more than twice as likely as male inmates in prison (1.9%) or jail (1.3%) to report experiencing inmate- on-inmate sexual victimization.
    * Sexual activity with facility staff was reported by 2.9% of male prisoners and 2.1% of male jail inmates, compared to 2.1% of female prisoners and 1.5% of female jail inmates.

    So, female inmates are more likely to be victimized by other female inmates then male inmates are to be victimized by other male inmates. Further it’s male prisoners who are more at risk of being victimized by staff then female prisoners.

    Also, the margin between the sexual exploitation of men and women in relationships is nonexistent.

    How do you intend to integrate this new information into your advocacy?

  6. typhon: How do you intend to integrate this new information into your advocacy?

    How else? By letting the crickets tell the story.

    Chirp-chirp.

    Chirp-chirp.

    Aren’t they beautiful?

  7. On a feminist blog, I mentioned how White Feathers pushed even minor boys to enlist in the British Army in WW1 and how it was shame about being seen as a coward and unmasculine by definition, which did this.

    This is what I was replied with:

    “Breaking news. Men are the ones who set up the idea that men should go die for their country and them alone. Men were the ones who pushed the idea of the draft. You’re just repeating the same things over again but this time it sounds like you’re blaming women for this. You’re blaming cogs in a system, not the ones who are /actually running it/. Men. Don’t try to put this shit on women. ”

    So you see, the fact that some people on top of the hierarchy have the same bits as you, means it’s all better and the shame those men experienced being treated as cowards was all fake and fabricated I’m sure – because women have no power don’t you know?

  8. I didn’t realize it would embed it if I posted the link!

    Serious trigger warning for anyone who has ever been victimized by a female rapist on that video. It basically tells you that you don’t exist or don’t matter.

  9. Oh my goodness TB that’s harsh. I can only hope that this is part of a series and there are other commercials that actually cover rape/abuse that’s not male against female. But more than likely not…

  10. Danny, I’m sad to report that Riverview has no other commericals depicting the other side. One of them even has the image where it’s only women speaking out.

    In fact, here are the replies to criticism of the video.

    All from the mouth of the channel owner:

    “Sexist and offensive because it talks about boys and men?”

    “Plenty. What you see above is but just one example of our efforts to raise awareness. Please know that our prevention efforts include the ENTIRE community. (men and women) We serve a number of people in our counseling and advocacy programs that have been assaulted by women.”

    “Please note you are only seeing one commercial. We understand that violence is perpetrated by both men and women. The reality is though that men perpetrate far more violence than women and are assaulted at alarming rates. Something needs to change in regards to how we define what it means to be a real man in today’s society.”

    “Back up your statement that women commit more violence than men with statistics/research or anything other than your opinion based in misogyny.”

    “I have not been in your situation but have worked with a number of people that have been. And sadly, your experience happens often; that is one of the problems in our work. Of course I am not saying that getting rid of male socialization will end all rape. As a man I am certainly not bashing males but simply acknowledging the stereotypes that exist for men that often lead to unhealthy relationships.”

    “Absolutely. No one is dismissing the fact that women are abusive as well. I often wonder why some individuals become so defensive when talking about men’s violence against women though….I think it speaks to why so many rape crisis centers and domestic violence shelters exist.”

    Remember, they’re responding to multiple commentators so the comments will appear scattershot.

    As far as the last comment is concerned, can you blame people for being defensive when rape crisis centers and domestic violence shelters like yours coninute to frame domestic violence and sexual abuse as something that happens to women from men?

    Well, they’d better develop a commercial that shows the other side as they promised in one of the responses. Otherwise, it’s propganda and nothing more.

  11. Schala: that sounds like just about the right intellectual level for a feminist response.

    Women: cogs in a system who mindlessly carry-out orders and presumably drool all over themselves in the process. Men: cat-stroking, cackling, Blofeldesque masterminds far more intelligent than any woman, except for feminists who are magically smarter and somehow- SOMEHOW- escaped the Patriarchal Mind Control Ray.

  12. @Danny…

    I’ve had a look at their videos and website. They only ever acknowledge harm to males from sexual violence by proxy ie by being related to abused females.

    Josh has stated only that Riverview “provides services” to men without actually saying what those services are. Elsewhere in their formal presentation they haven’t once explicitly acknowledged male victims.

    Regardless of the few very careful responses from Josh on the youtube thread the public face of the organisation is one in which male victims are rendered invisible. Reading or watching their stuff as a victim I would assume they wouldn’t accept me and that contacting them could result in my being mocked or worse. I would be forced to look elsewhere.

  13. From Riverview/Josh Jasper’s Blog…
    The Pack

    @Josh…

    I’m a long term member, and sitting board member, of a very similar, larger, organisation in Victoria, Australia.

    I’ve put several questions to you in the video discussion. Among those questions are a few you should be asking yourself right at this moment. Questions which go to the goals, beliefs and actual behaviour of your organisation and yourself.

    Instead of pointing your finger at a couple of extreme examples of misogyny why don’t you address the victims you’ve alienated? Seems there’s a few of them, myself included. We don’t appreciate being rendered invisible. Nor do we appreciate being told we must take responsibility for things we have never done, will never do, but that were done to us.

    Remember them? The victims? The ones you’re supposed to help.

    Speak to them. Not just in the video thread but in your broader outreach. Prove you are not like all those other organisations who mock those victims and call them liars. Because that’s the face you are currently presenting to the world. One that seems oblivious to them and their pain and, through it’s actions, hurts them even more.

  14. gwallan: Remember them? The victims? The ones you’re supposed to help.

    Only if their genitals are of a predetermined shape.

    For Equaliteh!

  15. Damn. I’ve left two posts. The first is in moderation for some reason. It’s the more important of the two.

  16. The tone Josh Jaspers uses at his blog really makes it seem like he is unable to consider the possibility that the people who disagree with him might have a point; it certainly sounds like he doesn’t believe it’s male victims of sexual abuse (by a female abuser) who are offended by the ad (instead his comment that the people who attack the ad don’t know what it’s like to be “oppressed, abused, degraded, and looked down upon” would be all the more distressing).

    The martial tone of his follow-up post doesn’t make him look much better. I don’t think any arguments brought forth by anyone like gwallan or TS, ie male victim’s advocates, are in the least bit likely to shake his convictions ever so little; best luck to you, none the less.

  17. Sorry for the double post: There’s also the fact that linking “rape” and the image of a male infant is very very wrong and uncomfortable for all the wrong reasons. That this linking (intentionally or unintentionally) paints even male babies as potential rapists once they grow up should have been clear to the makers of the ad; as well as the fact that they are practically saying: “If we don’t do something about it, this individual innocent child we filmed here is likely to become a rapist,” which puts such an amount of suspicion on this kid that it arguably borders on child abuse of the boy (“arguably” because I don’t think it unquestionably does; the argument that it does, however, has more merit than just to be rejected as an extreme wilfull misreading and overblown anti-feminist overreaction).

  18. watson: The commercial is because all males are potential rapists.

    Jeez, doesn’t anyone listen to feminists anymore?

  19. Lost all my formatting. My fault. Copied the preview.

    Figleaf…

    First, it’s still the case that more women are victims of sexual assault than men. Maybe not by as wide a margin as some people think but still by a hefty margin.

    No, it’s not the case that more women are victims. Like the rest you casually ignore prison rape. And none of this bullshit about their rapists being men either. They are victims as much as any others.

    Second, because most perpetrators of sexual assault on men are themselves men there’s not really that much women can do about it.

    Bullshit. Women can stop applauding and making excuses for those women who brutalise men and boys. I’ve never seen anything more disgusting than the overt, shameless cheering and applause women engaged in over Lorena Bobbit or the Oprah audiences applauding the rapists of little boys.

    They celebrate rape, mutilation, any sort of violence as long as it’s as woman doing it to a male. Fucking hypocrites.

  20. The martial tone of his follow-up post doesn’t make him look much better. I don’t think any arguments brought forth by anyone like gwallan or TS, ie male victim’s advocates, are in the least bit likely to shake his convictions ever so little; best luck to you, none the less.

    I believe the same thing. However, since Josh apparently works with male victims, his convictions will do more harm than good. So while nothing may change his mind, I still think it is worthwhile to attempt to help Josh see the other side of the issue.

    There’s also the fact that linking “rape” and the image of a male infant is very very wrong and uncomfortable for all the wrong reasons. That this linking (intentionally or unintentionally) paints even male babies as potential rapists once they grow up should have been clear to the makers of the ad; as well as the fact that they are practically saying: “If we don’t do something about it, this individual innocent child we filmed here is likely to become a rapist,” which puts such an amount of suspicion on this kid that it arguably borders on child abuse of the boy

    I think that is what most people are objecting to. That was certainly how I took the ad, and I find it difficult to believe anyone else who viewed it would see it any differently. I understood that the intention was, but the way in which it was done has the (presumably) opposite effect. This is one of the reasons why I do not like hyperbolic imagery. It is so easy for it to go too far.

  21. I wanted to thank you, TS and gwallan. It actually helps me as a survivor to know there are advocates out there that are fighting for a healing space free of political activism and agendas.

  22. ‘So while nothing may change his mind, I still think it is worthwhile to attempt to help Josh see the other side of the issue. ”

    What might do more good is to apprise Josh’s bosses or whoever funds him of his biases and they harm they do.

  23. “If we don’t do something about it, this individual innocent child we filmed here is likely to become a rapist,” which puts such an amount of suspicion on this kid that it arguably borders on child abuse of the boy

    Yes. Its as if we are being told that we have to keep an eye on even the youngest boys because they are just waiting for the chance to attack the next available woman/girl.

    gwallan:
    Bullshit. Women can stop applauding and making excuses for those women who brutalise men and boys. I’ve never seen anything more disgusting than the overt, shameless cheering and applause women engaged in over Lorena Bobbit or the Oprah audiences applauding the rapists of little boys.

    They celebrate rape, mutilation, any sort of violence as long as it’s as woman doing it to a male. Fucking hypocrites.

    Hell yeah. I have a real problem with this thing about ignoring such violence and then wanting to get concerned after they interalize that treatment and lash out later.

    No one wanted to help Little Johnny when he was abused by a woman but when he grows up and Jonathan abuses his girlfriend THEN the champions of gender justice come out tripping over themselves to stop him and his abusive ways and will do everything in their power to actively avoid his upbringing as having anything to do with it. That versus when grown up Samantha abuses her boyfriend and those same people will come out of the woodworks looking for anything they can (usually some male who abused her in her past) to prove that while what she did was bad she was the real victim.

  24. re Josh and Riverview

    Now this IS interesting…

    By: Tim on February 9, 2011 at 6:56 am

    “Greg Allan is my new hero.

    As someone who has met Josh and knows who he is, I would have to say that everyone here is playing into his hand. He likes to get on his soapbox and spew controversy for his ’cause’. A lot of times his ’cause’ seems to get lost and it is difficult to see what his agenda is. More often than not, his agenda seems to be bettering Josh Jasper’s public image or getting his name known. I cannot say this enough….The Riverview Center is a GREAT organization and does a lot of good for my community, Dubuque. I have met many of the people who work there and have rallied behind them in the past at fundraisers and in commercials. Josh has taken the great things that the consolers do there, taken the focus off of how much they help, and turned the spotlight on him. And he wouldn’t have it any other way. The Riverview Center will be all that much better when he is no longer employed there. They will not have to worry about what this joker is out there saying and will not have to worry about bad public image. There are ways to create awareness and they are ways to set people off and create controversy. Josh needs to stop worrying about Josh, and start worrying about the victims of the community that he claims he helps. I am just thankful the rest of the staff at Riverview is so great at what they do so the people can get the help they need.”

  25. I’ve just noticed your link to The Invisible Boy is defunct.

    Yes, I noticed that some time ago. I have been looking for another link. Normally I would remove the defunct link, but I do not want to forget that I need to replace it, so I have left it there.

  26. Figleaf,

    I’m a daily reader of Toy Soldiers and also a male rape survivor. While I don’t consider myself an MRA or feminist, I am hostile to neither and have friends in both camps. I consider myself to be a human rights and civil libertarian. Other labels are not necessary.

    Guess what? I’m also a member of a civil liberties coalition that urged Holder to take action on PREA’s recommended standards for eradicating prison rape. See below for our latest letter:

    http://jameslandrith.com/content/view/3664/40/

    While I don’t consider my self a fan of many of the far-right, conservative groups on the letter, I am surprised to see a total lack of mainstream feminist presence in the coalition. Given that sexual violence is a key issue within most feminist organizations, supporting the coalition’s concerns should have been a no-brainer. Signatures and comments were collected for nearly two months before the letter was issued.

    What gives?

  27. Jlandrith- jeez feminists can’t do EVERYTHING!

    I mean in SF, NOW is tied-up in a legal battle against Hooters.

    Thy DO have priorities and mehnz being raped simply isn’t something the overtaxed Equality-Warriors have time for.

    What, you expect feminists to brush your teeth for you, too?

  28. “I mean in SF, NOW is tied-up in a legal battle against Hooters.”

    What are you trying to say, aych? That NOW considers it more important to focus on the contribution of waitresses in hot pants and tank tops to ‘rape culture’ then the fact that male rape victims(mostly non-violent offenders in prison) are thrown to the wolves as a matter of policy and public indifference?

    But NOW is all about equality!

  29. Pingback: Top posts of 2011 | Toy Soldiers

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