A Dose of Stupid v126

It happens every day. In fact, it is pretty hard to avoid it. There are some things that can only be understood with a slap on the forehead. Things so mind-boggling that one wonders how humans managed to evolve thumbs while being this mentally inept. Case in point:

The Washington Post throws its own study under the bus

It must suck when the evidence does not support your narrative. The Washington Post reviewed the federal campus safety data for over 2,000 colleges. According to their findings, over 1,300 of those schools had no reports of rape on campus in 2014. That would seem like a good thing. After all, it would imply no one was raped on campus. However, the Washington Post took the results a different way:

There were no rapes reported in 2014 at California State University at Long Beach, a public university with about 36,000 students. That could seem like a positive sign. But school officials aren’t boasting about it. They know sexual violence victims are often reluctant to step forward, and they want to hear more often from survivors.

“We always operate under the assumption that zero does not really mean zero,” said Cal State Long Beach spokesman Mike Uhlenkamp. “We realize that under-reporting will happen. It is a fact based on the national data. We’re going to try to do what we can to change that culture on our campus.”

Uhlenkamp is correct. Zero reports does not mean zero incidents of sexual violence. However, it also does not mean that 1 in 5 women are raped while in college. Indeed, it would imply that assaults on college campuses are not that common. The Washington Post was undeterred by that:

The numbers underscore what is often a huge gulf between the estimated prevalence of sexual violence on campus and the actual number of reports schools receive. A Post-Kaiser Family Foundation poll last year found that one in five young women who attended college in a four-year span said they had been sexually assaulted during that time — a finding echoed in other surveys. But a far smaller share said they reported such incidents to school authorities.

The interesting part about the survey is that if one actually reads it, one will find curious things. For example, more women than men considered women responsible reported higher rates of negative assumptions among other students about female victims:

washpo 01

It also worth noting that the same questions were never asked about male victims. All of the questions specific to victims’ action and concerns were gendered and only asked of female victims.

Another example are the sexual assaults results. To the researchers’ credit, they did not gender the terms. They only specified what was included:

– Sexual intercourse (READ IF NEEDED: IF FEMALE: someone’s penis being put in your vagina. IF MALE: someone made you put your penis in their vagina)

 

– Anal sex (READ IF NEEDED: ALL: someone’s penis being put in your anus. IF MALE: Or someone made you put your penis in their anus)

 

– And, Sexual penetration with a finger or object (READ IF NEEDED: someone putting their finger or an object in (IF FEMALE: your vagina or anus/IF MALE: your anus).

The problem comes in when one looks at the results. For instance, when asked, “Since starting college/While you were in college) (has/did) anyone (had/have) sexual contact with you by using physical force or threatening to physically harm you?”, 99% of men and 91% of women answered ‘no‘. That is a direct question about rape, and 95% of those asked said they were never raped. When asked if someone attempted rape, 98% of men and 89% of women answered ‘no’. Again, 93% of those asked said no assault happened. So where does the 1 in 5 number come from?

They made it up.

Or to be more accurate, they included acts in which the person said they were incapacitated:

Fortunately, the survey provides a combo chart to show exactly how they manipulated the data:

washpo 03

I quoted the survey directly so that full context can be understood. While I would agree that sex with an incapacitated person is rape, this survey lacks any context about the interaction. It could be that the person was drunk or high and someone took advantage of them. It could also be that the person was too drunk or high to remember giving consent. That is not clear from the questions.

And yes, the survey does ask “about events you think, but are not certain, happened”. The problem is that the survey does not ask how a person is certain someone had sex with them without their consent while they were incapacitated. That is a very important question to ask because without that context the survey results could include any number of incidents are technically not rape or sexual assault.

This does not mean the results are wrong. It only means that without asking for clearer context, it is odd to add those numbers together.

Another lack of context is the actual location of the assaults. Note the language the survey used: Since starting college/While you were in college. Neither of those necessarily mean the assaults happened on the college campus or at a college event. They only mean that the acts occurred during the time the person attended school. This the same kind of loose definition Mary Koss used in her Ms Magazine survey in the 1990s that found that 1 in 4 college women were raped while in college.

The question that both surveys asked do not say that. Or, as the Washington Post reports:

“It’s a harsh reality that a lot of parents and others in society don’t want to deal with: Sexual violence is on every campus,” said Laura L. Dunn, founder and executive director of the advocacy group SurvJustice. “Any time you have a zero, it is not an indicator of safety. It is an indicator of comfort in reporting.”

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) said there are two explanations for why schools would have no rape reports: “Either they don’t have an adequate reporting system … or they know about the rapes and are putting them under the rug.”

Right. Following the Ms Magazine survey, most colleges created rape crisis and counseling centers. All of these are run by or in conjunction with Women’s Studies departments. Most of them receive a far amount of funding despite their apparent lack of use. They spent the last two decades peddling the notion that rape is a systemic problem on college campuses. They hosted Take Back the Night rallies, forums to teach men not to rape, and scores of lectures by women about sexual violence.

Again, most of this is controlled by feminists. So if any of it is inadequate, who is to blame? If rape is being pushed under a rug, who is to blame? If women are not coming forward, who is to blame?

The evidence listed by the Washington Post suggests that there are not nearly as many rapes happening on campus as feminists claim. This does not mean no sexual assaults happened. It only means that the narrative and the actual data do not match. Even when they conduct surveys to determine the rate of rape the narrative and data do not match. It is only when they resort to poorly defined incidents that they are able to concoct the number they want.

That is where the trouble lies. It is not about actually stopping sexual violence. It is simply about feminists pushing their “women are perpetual victims” narrative.

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8 thoughts on “A Dose of Stupid v126

  1. Pingback: A Dose of Stupid v126 – Manosphere.org

  2. @TS…

    In that first table they were asking students to define the attitudes of others rather than their own beliefs. Thus women have a greater belief that those “negative” attitudes exist among OTHERS.

    That’s one question out of at least twenty two. Is the rest of it so indirect? ie getting folk to make judgements about what other people believe?

  3. As a father of two daughters and a son (so far), I find two things leap out in this survey-

    1. 80% of male college rape victims and 70% of college female rape victims were incapacitated, presumably due to alcohol consumption, at the time of the attack. If you include suspected attacks, those numbers raise to 100% (?!) and 88%.

    2. The percentage of college women who think it is common to hold female victims responsible for getting drunk (60%) is nearly the same as the percentage who think it is common to think women dressed in revealing clothing are in trouble (59%)!

    In spite of the fact that alcohol consumption enables the overwhelmingly majority or campus rapes, and the lack of any reason at all to believe that rapists notice or care about fashion choices, college girls appear to believe wearing a cardigan is nearly as effective a deterrent as staying sober.

    If people were at all interested in crime prevention, that would be the headline. We can almost certainly prevent a lot of rapes by teaching kids the correct risk factors. But nooooo… that would be “victim-blaming”.

    Instead, we give kids consent education that is entirely useless for preventing drunk rape since a drunk person can’t give or understand consent anyways.

    Tamen-
    What a stupid line. It manages to be biologically incorrect and asinine at the same time. If we consider it prerequisite for rape victims to have erections then I guess there are no female rape victims.

  4. Peter …
    “If people were at all interested in crime prevention, that would be the headline. We can almost certainly prevent a lot of rapes by teaching kids the correct risk factors. But nooooo… that would be “victim-blaming”.”

    You’re right .. BUT .. Where’s the money & power in that .. as we both know .. The Universities have been corupt for a long time .. & with the governments help .. will remain so.

    TS .. love your work.

  5. Greg:

    In that first table they were asking students to define the attitudes of others rather than their own beliefs. Thus women have a greater belief that those “negative” attitudes exist among OTHERS.

    Thank you for the correction.

  6. honeycomb:

    You’re right .. BUT .. Where’s the money & power in that .. as we both know .. The Universities have been corupt for a long time .. & with the governments help .. will remain so.

    I think the bigger problem is that alcohol prevention typically fails. We tried it with prohibition and it did not work. There is little way it will work on college campuses unless they heavily punish students for drinking. The problem is that it is tricky to catch, particularly if the parties are held off-campus.

    Peter:

    If people were at all interested in crime prevention, that would be the headline. We can almost certainly prevent a lot of rapes by teaching kids the correct risk factors. But nooooo… that would be “victim-blaming”.

    Instead, we give kids consent education that is entirely useless for preventing drunk rape since a drunk person can’t give or understand consent anyways.

    On New Year’s Eve, my then 15-year-old got to drink whatever he wanted. His father gave him permission and my godson downed a couple of shots of Irish whiskey, some rum, and a bit of wine. He got very drunk, which surprisingly makes him rather quiet, and the next day suffered a fairly bad hangover. Now he will not go near alcohol.

    We can tell teens and college students not to drink, yet I think we all know from experience that until they actually do it and realize the affect it has on them, they will ignore most prevention efforts. I think this is part of the reason why people find it easier to go after consent. No one is really going to convince college students not to drink. It would be as pointless as trying to convincing them not to use their smartphones.

  7. TS-

    Wait- are you telling me it’s hard to get kids to listen and use common sense? *I have never experienced this.*

    I don’t expect my kids to not drink. I certainly don’t expect them to not have sex. Truth be told, I think I might actually prefer it if my daughters turn out to be, for lack of a better term, sluts.

    I’ve got a decade or so to figure out how to word this so they’ll be receptive, but what I hope to teach my daughters is that you don’t need to stay sober to avoid rape when intoxicated, you just need to take reasonable precautions before you start drinking. If you are going on a date and plan to drink but not hook up, just tell the guy your intentions beforehand- better yet, email or text the guy your intentions beforehand. If you are going to a party or bar, make sure you have someone sober to get you out of there if you are about to pass out or do something you regret. These things work.

    No idea what I will teach my son. -Luckily, I’m pretty sure he’s transgender-.

    Happy (God)father’s day, by the way.

    *sarcasm font*
    -I wish this was sarcasm font-

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