College rape culture and the death of due process

Christina Hoff Sommers interviewed Stuart Taylor. Taylor authored the book The Campus Rape Frenzy, which details the feminist claim of a “rape epidemic” on college campuses and their attempt to roll back due process for students accused of rape.

Taylor highlights in the interview the myriad ways in which the due process of students are violated in an attempt to peddle the feminist agenda. He highlights that these new “listen and believe” rules do not apply to male victims. A male student claiming rape have little chance of his claim being taken seriously. If the both parties are intoxicated and the male claims rape, Taylor suggests that this would be taken as a malicious counter claim and dismissed.

More worrisome is the presumption of guilt. Accused students are not afforded council, not allowed to the see the evidence against them, not allowed to cross examine witnesses, not allowed to present witnesses, and often are not informed of the complaints until the process is well underway. This forces the accused to prove their innocence, something that is a clear violation of constitutional law. Continue reading

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