Woman who raped student sues him for “defamation”

It is rare that any case of women sexually abusing boys leaves me at a loss for words. I have read about the most ridiculous situations, from women claiming the boys raped them to women suing their victims for child support. However, the most recent case left me stunned.

A woman convicted of sexually abusing one of her 16-year-old students filed a lawsuit against the boy for “defamation”:

The former Arroyo Grande High School teacher convicted earlier this year of having sex with a 16-year-old student has responded to a lawsuit from that student’s family by filing a counterclaim, alleging the victim has defamed her “to various classmates, family and other members of the community.”

I will quote it again just in case the multiple face palms prevented you from reading it in full: Continue reading

Jody Allard reveals feminism’s true abusive colors

Jody Allard is back. For those who do not recall, Allard wrote an article in 2016 titled My teen boys are blind to rape culture. Allard argued in the article that despite all her efforts as a good feminist single mother, her two teenage sons are riddled with misogyny. Instead of taking heed of Allard’s demands that they check their privilege, stop their internalized misogyny, and challenge their friends who deal in “rape culture”, the boys laughed her off.

Any reasonable parent would look at that response and reflect on their own behavior. They would ask themselves why this approach did not work. They would ask why their children reject the very foundation of their parent’s identity and political beliefs.

Allard, however, is not a reasonable parent. She is a narcissistic, passive-aggressive, sociopathic ideologue, and so she does what anyone so mentally deranged would do: blame and publicly humiliate her sons. Again. For the fourth time. Here is the title of her most recent article:

I’m Done Pretending Men Are Safe (Even My Sons)

Think of what type of person you must be to write something so vicious about your own sons. Think about how warped your mind must be to in one breath say that your sons are good and in the next accuse them of being rapists. Because that is what Allard did. You need not take my word for it. Take Allard’s: Continue reading

Still In Plain Sight: The Plight of Afghan Boys

How long does it take for someone to consider a widely known instance of systematic child rape to be a problem? Clearly it is not ten years because that is how long the West has known about the plight of Afghanistan’s boys.

I first wrote about the bacha bazi or dancing boys in 2007. Ten years later, there are still articles claiming that this situation is hidden. How could it possibly be hidden when I, a practical nobody who lives thousands of miles from Afghanistan, have read and heard about it every year for the past decade? “Hidden” is not the appropriate word. “Ignored” would be more accurate.

An article featured on the Hindustan Times covers the topic yet again, with much the same horrific details about the treatment of these boys by their community. From the article: Continue reading

Stop The Abuse: The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

Often times people want to help others but do not know how. This cannot be any truer than when it comes to helping abused men and boys. The resources sometimes are not apparent and are often difficult to find. Sometimes the resources are hidden or even barred by other groups who wish to polarize the issue. The intent here is to provide those who wish to help male victims with the opportunity to do so.

Please remember that you do no have to empty your wallets to help. Even a small donation can go a long way. And for those on the other side of the issue, it would go a long way to demonstrating real concern for all victims if you donated as well.

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The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

About NAPAC

We are the only national organisation focused on supporting adults who have been abused in any way as children. We know that most children who are abused don’t talk about it until they become adults and NAPAC exists to support survivors of child abuse when want to talk and receive support.

We aim to:

  1. Respond to the distress caused in adulthood by ill treatment and/or neglect in childhood.
  2. Establish a national information line and postal service for people requiring advice and information about help available to overcome the continuing impact of childhood abuse in adulthood.
  3. Provide support, training, information and resources to persons and organisations supporting people who have experienced ill treatment and/or neglect in childhood.
  4. Raise public awareness of the continuing impact of childhood abuse in adulthood.
  5. Effectively campaign to alleviate the impact of child abuse in adulthood.

We plan to achieve these aims by:

  • Continuing to run our national freephone Support Line for adults who have suffered any type of abuse during childhood.
  • The publication of helpful materials and information.
  • Establishing training packages for people and organisations supporting survivors.
  • The establishment, maintenance and monitoring of a national register of counsellors and therapists who are committed to assisting adults who have experienced child abuse
  • Organising seminars and conferences on relevant topics
  • Promoting and liaising with relevant bodies on issues pertaining to childhood abuse and its continuing impact in adulthood

Please donate and help make a difference.

The NISVS 2010-2012 Report – Continued

In the previous part, I discussed the CDC’s general findings from the recent 2012 survey. My analysis continues below.

As I mentioned in the previous post, the CDC’s numbers have remained consistent throughout the survey’s history. While I do think the researchers are manipulating the data in regards to sexual violence, they appear to do it same way each time. For example, the researchers again found that women commit the majority of sexual violence against male victims: Continue reading

The NISVS 2010-2012 Report

The CDC released a new National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). The survey combines data from the 2010, 2011, and 2012 numbers. Readers may notice that the most current data is from 2012, putting a five-year gap between the survey data and the current year. The researchers do not explain the delay, however, it does appear that both the 2011 and 2012 took increasingly longer periods of time to complete.

There are several things worth noting about the survey. It appears the CDC listened to the complaints about how they reported their findings. Readers may recall that in the 2010 survey the CDC repeatedly cited the rape statistics for male victims despite the “made to penetrate” victims showing a much higher prevalence rate. This resulted in skewed reporting, making it appear as if males are never victims of forcible or violent sexual assault. The researchers changed this in the current survey. They instead cite the higher “made to penetrate” rate, although this creates same problem as before (I will explain that later).

The term “made to penetrate” remains. The researchers continue to separate it from “rape” despite no one else studying, researching, or prosecuting sexual violence against males doing so. It remains as inexplicable as it was in 2011, although to the CDC’s credit they did not add in any nonsense about it not counting as rape since it is done primarily males as they did before.

The CDC again found that 1 in 3 women and 1 in 6 men experience some form of sexual violence in their lifetime. As with the previous survey, there is a higher rate of “made to penetrate” than rape among male victims. From the survey: Continue reading

Vili Fualaau files for separation from woman who raped him as boy

Vili Fualaau filed for separation from Mary Kay Letourneau, the woman who began raping Fualaau when he was 12-years-old. Police caught Letourneau after she became pregnant with Fualaau’s first child when he was 14-years-old. Letourneau faced a seven-year sentence. She received a six-month sentence with three months suspended and was required to attend sex offender treatment. However, shortly after being released, she was found again with Fualaau. The judge imposed the original seven-and-a-half year sentence. Letourneau gave birth to Fualaau’s second child while in prison. After Letourneau completed the sentence in 2004, Fualaau petitioned the court for the removal of the no-contact order imposed on Letourneau. The court granted the order, and in 2005 the pair were married.

This case has been an odd one because of Fualaau’s age at the time Letourneau began raping him, Letourneau’s supposed ignorance about the criminality and predatory nature of her actions, and the media’s desire to exploit the situation as just a hot teacher banging her totally willing student. One need only flip the sexes to see how preposterous such an idea is, and how unlikely anyone would applaud the marriage of a female child rape victim to her rapist.

Yet after almost 12 years of marriage, Faulaau filed for separation from Letourneau: Continue reading