Bulletin Board v295

Abuse of inmates in youth detention and adult facilities happening daily, prison chaplain says — Reverend Alex Gater has called for a royal commission into youth detention in the NT to cover Queensland, saying abuse has been happening for years in both prisons and juvenile detention centres. The royal commission was announced following revelations of abuse raised on ABC’s Four Corners program that have also led to the minister responsible for the detainees being sacked. Reverend Gater said her grandson had spent time in a detention centre and a prison, where she said he was physically abused by officers.

Boy tells court he does not blame mother for abuse he suffered — The 12-year-old son of a woman found guilty of child cruelty has told a court in a victim impact report that he doesn’t believe she did anything wrong. The child said he put the blame on his father (64), who was convicted last May of nine counts of raping the boy when he aged six and seven. The trial at the Central Criminal Court heard he also put the child in a wooden box and nailed it shut in their Waterford home.

Jury hears accounts of historical abuse at the hands of Caister man — Robert Brown, of Eastern Avenue, Caister, is on trial accused of sexually abusing five boys at a children’s home where he worked in the 1970s. Brown, 69, lived at the home in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, at the time. He has pleaded not guilty to 16 charges of indecent assault on five boys in the 1970s. Two witnesses told the Warwick Crown Court jury of incidents which took place during trips from Manor Court Road children’s home to Brown’s home town of Great Yarmouth. Continue reading

Ending the statute of limitations on sexual abuse cases

The statute of limitations in sexual abuse cases presents a problem for prosecutors. Many states limit the time a person has to report the abuse. The limits vary from state to state, yet they generally end within 10 years of the victim turning 18. This creates a confounding situation because many victims wait years to report the abuse. It is also troublesome in that each state varies how the law works.

In some states, the limitation is based on the last incident of abuse. In others, it is based on the person’s age. Illinois, where I live, uses the latter. The law currently states that people have until they are 38 to file a complaint, but only if they were born after 1981. This limit was removed to an extent in 2013. It now allows sex crimes against children to be reported at any time, however, this only applies if someone already reported the abuse or if there is evidence supporting the accusation.

The logic behind getting rid of the limitations is simple, as the Chicago Tribune explains: Continue reading

Bulletin Board v294

British man prosecuted after confronting priest who abused him as a boy — A British man who says he was abused by a Catholic missionary almost 50 years ago is being prosecuted in the Italian courts after he travelled to Verona to forgive his abuser. Mark Murray (60) was one of 11 men who settled out of court with the Comboni missionary order for abuse suffered during the 1960s and 1970s at Mirfield in Yorkshire. They received sums of between £7,000 and £30,000, paid by the order.

Do western feminists view the rest of the world differently? — Dear western feminists, As a woman raised in Afghanistan, I cringe when I type the word “western”. I know that the experience of being a woman in this world is fundamentally the same. When I write “western”, I don’t write it because I believe that you are physically different to me. After all, what better evidence is there for our basic common humanity as women than breast cancer? The disease has no respect for our ethnic or cultural particularities. It attacks all of us equally, with the indiscriminate force of universality.

Female Sing Sing guard admits to raping male inmate — A former corrections officer at Sing Sing Correctional Facility admitted Tuesday to raping an inmate while on the job in May 2015, according to authorities. Evita Hinds, 35, of Queens, pleaded guilty to one count of third degree rape, a class E felony. She faces up to four years in state prison when she is sentenced in October, Acting Westchester County District Attorney James A. McCarty said in a news release. Continue reading

The tangled web of lies from UVA’s Jackie unravel

Thanks to a current lawsuit against Rolling Stone magazine, more information about the UVA accuser Jackie Coakley made news. According to current reports, Coakley concocted a fake persona and lied about the gang rape in order to woo one of her male friends (one of the young men she later claimed told her not to seek help after she was “raped”):

In the filing, Eramo’s lawyers submitted new data from Yahoo concerning an e-mail account linked to “Haven Monahan,” the man Jackie identified to friends as the perpetrator of her assault. An investigation by the Charlottesville Police revealed that no person by that name has ever been a student at U-Va., and Eramo’s lawyers have presented evidence in court documents indicating that he is a figment of Jackie’s imagination.

Ryan Duffin, a student who knew Jackie at U-Va., told The Washington Post that he believed that the character was created by Jackie in an effort to attract Duffin’s romantic interest, a tactic known as “catfishing.”

Catfishing is when a person creates a fake persona online. It is sometimes used to trick another person into a romantic relationship, usually directly, but in this instance it was an attempt at causing jealously. It did not work. It appears that Duffin had no interest in Coakley. However, that did not stop the latter from trying: Continue reading

When false accusations take their toll

A feminist once stated about false accusations

“The accused would have a rough period. He might be suspended from his job; friends might de-friend him on Facebook. In the case of Bill Cosby, we might have to stop watching, consuming his books, or buying tickets to his traveling stand-up routine. These errors can be undone by an investigation that clears the accused, especially if it is done quickly.”

I wonder if she would apply that logic to Matthew Green. He went missing in 2010. This followed a tumultuous time he experienced dealing with a false accusation of rape. According to reports:

Matthew was investigated by police following an allegation of rape made by a girl, then aged 16.

Police surrounded his home and he spent 10 hours in custody as officers investigated the case.

But video footage taken from CCTV cameras showed that Matthew was at a petrol station in east London at time the alleged attack took place some 40 miles away in his hometown of Sittingbourne.

The girl then admitted her story was a complete fabrication and police dropped the case against Matthew.

His father Jim said today: ‘I think after everything that happened, it pushed him to the limit. From that time [his arrest] the boy we knew as outgoing, football and girls mad – he seemed to just stop.

‘From that he was never the same. Police officers came round to apologise after, I said look at that young boy. That’s what you’ve done to that young lad.

‘He became very withdrawn. His social life just went to nil. He packed up playing football, he wouldn’t go out. He began isolating himself in his bedroom and ate meals upstairs.’

Green turned to drugs and alcohol, ending up in a severe cycle of drug abuse prior to going missing. He remained missing for six years, and was recently discovered living in Spain. He reportedly is in psychiatric care refusing treatment. Continue reading

Man expelled for rape that never happened

It was only a matter of time before something like this happened:

Colorado State University-Pueblo suspended a male athlete for years after he was found responsible for sexually assaulting a female trainer. But the trainer never accused him of wrongdoing, and said repeatedly that their relationship was consensual. She even stated, unambiguously, “I’m fine and I wasn’t raped.”

That’s according to the athlete’s lawsuit against CSUP, which persuasively argues that the university not only deprived him of fundamental due process rights, but also denied sexual agency to an adult woman. Taken at face value, this case appears to represent one of the most paternalistic, puritanically anti-sex witch hunts ever reported on a college campus.

What makes the case so astounding is that the woman did not report the act. Someone else reported the act as rape, and the school took that person’s word over the actual alleged victim’s testimony. I do not like slippery slope arguments, yet this is a perfect example of those arguments sometimes being true. This only happened because of how loosely defined rape is on college campuses. This only happened because the desire to prevent rape trumps finding evidence a crime occurred.

It does not matter that the “victim” said the sex was consensual or that she met the man several times after the alleged rape or she did not want to pursue any charges or complaints against the man. All that matters is the narrative.

I could go on, however, TL;DR did an excellent job breaking down the pure insanity of this case: Continue reading

Stop The Abuse: The Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted

Often times people want to help others but do not know how. This cannot be any truer than when it comes to helping abused men and boys. The resources sometimes are not apparent and are often difficult to find. Sometimes the resources are hidden or even barred by other groups who wish to polarize the issue. The intent here is to provide those who wish to help male victims with the opportunity to do so. Every month I will post a new link to an organization that provides services for male victims. As the list grows, I will create a page where all the links can be found.

Please remember that you do no have to empty your wallets to help. Even a small donation can go a long way. And for those on the other side of the issue, it would go a long way to demonstrating real concern for all victims if you donated as well.

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The Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted

The Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted (AIDWYC) is a Canadian volunteer organization dedicated to preventing and rectifying wrongful convictions.

AIDWYC was founded in 1993. It is the direct successor to the Justice for Guy Paul Morin Committee, a grassroots organization that formed to support Guy Paul Morin immediately following his wrongful conviction in 1992.

When Guy Paul Morin was released on bail in February 1993 pending his appeal, this Committee reconstituted itself as AIDWYC, with the goal of acting in defence of all persons who have been wrongly convicted.

AIDWYC has two broad objectives: first, eradicating the conditions that can cause miscarriages of justice; and second, participating in the review and, where warranted, correction of wrongful convictions.
AIDWYC is a primarily voluntary, non-profit organization. At this time, AIDWYC’s focus is limited to murder convictions only.

Please donate and help make a difference.