College rape culture and the death of due process

Christina Hoff Sommers interviewed Stuart Taylor. Taylor authored the book The Campus Rape Frenzy, which details the feminist claim of a “rape epidemic” on college campuses and their attempt to roll back due process for students accused of rape.

Taylor highlights in the interview the myriad ways in which the due process of students are violated in an attempt to peddle the feminist agenda. He highlights that these new “listen and believe” rules do not apply to male victims. A male student claiming rape have little chance of his claim being taken seriously. If the both parties are intoxicated and the male claims rape, Taylor suggests that this would be taken as a malicious counter claim and dismissed.

More worrisome is the presumption of guilt. Accused students are not afforded council, not allowed to the see the evidence against them, not allowed to cross examine witnesses, not allowed to present witnesses, and often are not informed of the complaints until the process is well underway. This forces the accused to prove their innocence, something that is a clear violation of constitutional law. Continue reading

Two men ruled to be rapists despite never facing trial

Few things are as frightening as the lack of due process. The idea that someone could be held responsible for an act they may not have done without any means of defending themselves brings up thoughts of the medieval Inquisition. One would think that as a society we would be past the point of denying someone a trial or any means of defending themselves. Yet a UK judge recently ruled that two men accused of rape are “rapists” despite neither men facing any charges or trial:

A former Scotland international footballer and his ex-teammate have been ruled to be rapists and ordered to pay £100,000 damages despite never facing a criminal trial.

Denise Clair, who was left “devastated” by a Crown decision not to prosecute, sued striker David Goodwillie.

She also sued Goodwillie’s then Dundee United colleague David Robertson.

She claimed they raped her at a flat in Armadale, in West Lothian, after a night out in Bathgate in January 2011.

It was the first civil rape case of its kind in Scotland.

The first question this raises is why the Crown chose not to prosecute. Rape cases are often difficult to prosecute due to lack of evidence or the accuser’s lack of credibility or the accused possessing an alibi. There are a number of other reasons that go into that decision. That the case was not prosecuted is not evidence of misconduct or disbelief. It may simply be a situation in there is no way to put on a winning case.

According to the article: Continue reading

Bulletin Board v299

80.9% of sex convicts in Lagos prisons abused during childhood — At least, 80.9 percent of sex convicts and inmates awaiting trial for sexual and gender based violence in Lagos prisons have been abused during childhood, a recent report has revealed. The report, conducted by the Lagos State Domestic and Sexual Response Team, DSVRT, revealed that due to the early abuse, the inmates had been sexually active, leading to sexual offences being committed by them.

Archdiocese of Ottawa paid former altar boy $50,000 after sex abuse allegations — More than a decade before the Archdiocese of Ottawa told Jacques Faucher he could no longer be a priest, it paid tens of thousands of dollars to a former altar boy who had accused the reverend of molesting him. Faucher was convicted in March of historical sex offences against three other children, but newly obtained documents by the Sun show the diocese wrote a $50,000 cheque to a former altar boy when he was an adult in 1998, more than a year after he told the church about the alleged sexual abuse.

Denver man freed after 28 years in prison acquitted of rape — A Denver man who spent more than a quarter of a century in prison for a rape he long denied committing was acquitted of the crime on Monday, leaving a courtroom to applause from supporters and chants of “it’s over.” Clarence Moses-EL, 60, was freed in December, after a judge overturned his 1988 conviction on rape and assault charges and found that he would likely be acquitted if his case went to trial again. Continue reading

Nate Parker learns a lesson about social justice politics

A woman accused Nate Parker and his roommate Jean McGianni Celestin rape in 1999. The woman claimed that the two men assaulted her while she was intoxicated and unconscious. The two men professed their innocence, claiming the sex was consensual. A jury acquitted Parker, but convicted Celestin. Celestin later won an appeal. The woman later sued the school, Penn State, and received a settlement. According to reports, she committed suicide in 2012.

In most instances, this would be the end of the story. However, Parker recently directed the film Birth of a Nation, and the interest in the film brought attention to his past. Given the politicized nature of sexual violence and the current politics playing out with the campus rape “epidemic”, the media immediately latched onto this part of Parker’s past. Continue reading

Bulletin Board v298

Dogged determination delivers justice for victims caught up in 20 year web of sexual abuse — Shame. Guilt. Fear. Anger. This is the impact sexual abuse has on its victims. Some of the young men molested by Taranaki man Nigel Allan Hauauru Nelson feigned sleep, froze or blocked out their feelings, using drugs and alcohol as a means to cope. Others chose to lock it away and not talk to police at all. But thanks to the efforts of New Plymouth Detective Pat Tongi and his team, Nelson will be held accountable for the harm he caused to 14 men.

Ex-police officer abused two boys at offenders’ centre, court told — A retired police superintendent sexually abused two boys in the 1980s when he ran an attendance centre for young offenders, a jury has been told. Gordon Anglesea, 78, a former officer with North Wales police, abused the boys when they were 14 or 15, the court heard. The first alleged victim claims that he was assaulted by Anglesea in the showers and a changing room of the centre in Wrexham, north Wales.

Families apologize after more sex abuse details surface against dead Minnesota teacher, spouse — The families of South St. Paul teacher Aric Babbitt and his husband spoke publicly Wednesday for the first time about alleged sexual abuse of teen boys made against the couple before they turned up dead last week in Washington of an apparent murder-suicide.When reached by the Pioneer Press at his South St. Paul home, Babbitt’s father read a statement he said was prepared on behalf of his family and Matthew Deyo’s family. Continue reading

Bulletin Board v297

Elementary School Teacher Killed in Apparent Murder-Suicide May Have Abused Multiple Kids: Reports — A Minnesota elementary school teacher and his husband, who were found dead last week in an apparent murder-suicide in Washington state, may have sexually abused multiple underage boys, according to reports. Aric Babbitt, 40, and Matthew Deyo, 36, were reportedly found dead on Lopez Island on Aug. 25, just two weeks after one of Babbitt’s former students went to police and accused him of sexual assault.

Exposed: UP’s hell prison where inmates suffer vicious torture and corruption — The crime team of India Today has unearthed a prison that has turned into a vicious hub of third-degree torture, abuse and corruption. Here, an inmate is pinned down on the ground, with his feet up and locked in bamboo sticks by fellow prisoners. Unbearable screams pierce through the large hall as a deputy jailer unleashes a flurry of club blows on his bare soles.

Family of malnourished boy found dead in Echo Park closet had been reported to social workers six times — Days apart in 2012, two teachers contacted the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services about a young boy named Yonatan Daniel Aguilar. One reported that the boy was suffering from general neglect. Another said he had a black eye. County social workers interviewed school employees, including a soccer coach and a special education teacher. Continue reading

Ending the statute of limitations on sexual abuse cases

The statute of limitations in sexual abuse cases presents a problem for prosecutors. Many states limit the time a person has to report the abuse. The limits vary from state to state, yet they generally end within 10 years of the victim turning 18. This creates a confounding situation because many victims wait years to report the abuse. It is also troublesome in that each state varies how the law works.

In some states, the limitation is based on the last incident of abuse. In others, it is based on the person’s age. Illinois, where I live, uses the latter. The law currently states that people have until they are 38 to file a complaint, but only if they were born after 1981. This limit was removed to an extent in 2013. It now allows sex crimes against children to be reported at any time, however, this only applies if someone already reported the abuse or if there is evidence supporting the accusation.

The logic behind getting rid of the limitations is simple, as the Chicago Tribune explains: Continue reading