Where are all the Outraged Feminists?

I meant to post this a while ago, but it slipped my mind. Youtuber TL;DR takes on the rather bizarre claim made by June Eric-Udorie that no men or men’s rights activists talked about Survivors UK losing their funding. She states:

I am outraged and we all should be. Survivors UK run a vital service for men who have been affected by sexual abuse and if it shuts, this will affect countless men in London. But perhaps what makes me angrier is that so few men and men’s rights activists (more commonly known as MRAs online) have condemned this. I’m always being told that feminists don’t give a shit about issues like male rape or suicide. In fact, our detractors contend, feminists don’t give a shit about men. In case you missed the memo, feminists hate men. At least that’s the impression that we get from anti-feminist men and MRAs, mostly active on the web where they moan about men being oppressed because obviously, being a man is so hard these days.

Except there were scores of men’s rights activists writing about it. I discovered what happened because I saw it on r/mensrights on Reddit. TL;DR destroys Eric-Udorie’s idiotic assertion. He also shows what I discovered after I went searching for more information about what happened: virtually no feminists mentioned the funding cut. The only feminist place I found discussing was Salon.

Dear Marvel, You Can’t Win

Several months ago I wrote about an article featured on ComicsAlliance. Juliet Khan, the author, wrote a rant about Marvel and DC Comics’s recent attempts to appeal to progressive feminist female readers. Her complaint was that the new femalecharacters were bland and boring. Of course, this is precisely what feminists like Khan asked for. They want female characters who never do bad things, never make mistakes, never have bad things happen to them, and never have any character flaws. All this leaves creators with are characters who can only be snarky and sassy.

As I noted at the end of my post, people like Khan knew what the end result would be because comic book fans warned them. We told these progressives that their ideas were boring, yet they ignored us and demanded these characters anyway. And for inexplicable reason, both of the Big Two companies caved.

Now another ComicsAllaince writer shows us why capitulating to the so-called “social justice warrior” crowd is pointless. Continue reading

This is why we can’t have nice things

One of the common mantras used by the far left is that we as a society “need” something. This thing typically is not an actual necessity. It is never food, water, air, clothing, education, or the like. It is usually something trivial and pertains to the progressive ideology. For example, take Bustle’s recent article titled Why Being A Geek Also Means Being A Feminist, Because Why Should Guys Have All The Fun?

Shaun Fitzpatrick regales readers with her insights about the importance of feminism in the geek community. One knows it will be a rather pedantic escapade when an article begins with:

As I write this, I am currently wearing a button down, a pair of suspenders, and have a bow-tie and fez in my backpack (I’m waiting to get out of work and dress up for a Doctor Who exhibit at a local spot). I feel a little bit like Clark Kent, hiding my nerdy superpowers from an office full of unsuspecting co-workers. Not that I’m really that interested in hiding. I am a geek, a fangirl, a card carrying, feels-having, obsessive devotee toward a select group of shows, movies, and books that have captured my heart and imagination and make me incapable of shutting up if someone mentions them in my presence.

But I’m also a pretty outspoken feminist, which at times can seem like a conundrum.

It is a conundrum, although not for the reason Fitzpatrick thinks. The issue is the “but” in her sentence. The word “but” is a term of negation. It implies that the clause preceding it is untrue in part or in whole. By stating that she is a geek, but also a feminist, Fitzpatrick implies that being a geek is anathema to being a feminist. I would agree. The two do not go well together. Fitzpatrick explains why: Continue reading

Why Do People Hate Feminism?

Sargon of Akkad has an excellent video series on the reasons why people take issue with feminism. He presents a thorough explanation of the problems within feminism as an ideology and with its adherents. Some feminists may object to Sargon’s tone, however, he comes across as fair. He does not paint all feminists as the Borg. He acknowledges that different feminists think different things. Yet he also notes that the voices we hear tend to come from the authoritarian, anti-male element of the movement.

This is an ongoing series, so as Sargon uploads videos I will add them to this page. Continue reading

A Dose of Stupid v114

It happens every day. In fact, it is pretty hard to avoid it. There are some things that can only be understood with a slap on the forehead. Things so mind-boggling that one wonders how humans managed to evolve thumbs while being this mentally inept. Case in point:

Jessica Valenti.

That is all.

In Defense of Bigotry

It did not take long for a feminist to rally behind Bahar Mustafa. I mentioned in my prior post that Mustafa faces criticism, job termination, and potential criminal charges as a result of hate-speech she used on Twitter. Mustafa defended her use of the hashtag #killallwhitemen by claiming they were “in-jokes and ways that many people in the queer feminist community express ourselves.”

Keep in mind that Mustafa is Goldsmiths’ University union’s welfare and diversity officer. Her job is to be unbiased. Her job is to speak out against in-jokes told at other groups’ expense. To claim that the jokes are acceptable because of past wrongs is illogical and indefensible.

Enter Slate’s Amanda Hess: Continue reading

Be Careful What You Ask For

For years feminists clamored about the lack of female characters in comic books. They demanded more titles featuring superheroines. The comic book industry needed these super women, feminists claimed, in order to break up the “boys’ club.”

Feminists demanded strong female leads. They wanted women who were unafraid of anything. They wanted women who did not rely on archetypes or tropes. They wanted women who did not need a man. They wanted books that not only focused on women, but featured all-female casts.

So the industry gave feminists what they asked for. It took some time. There were a few false starts — the Minx line, Marvel Divas, Girl Comics. However, eventually Marvel and DC, the former in particular, managed to get it right and give feminists exactly they wanted. And now:

Smart, Nice and Sassy: ‘Good Girl’ Role Models Make Boring Heroes

I will allow ComicsAlliance’s Juliet Khan explain: Continue reading