Calgary Expo sends cop to badger the Badgers

I just read this on Twitter:

Here is an explanation: several people attended the expo to meet the Honey Badgers. Following the Badgers’ ejection from the Calgary Comics Expo, the group decided to find a place where their fans could meet them. They chose a park located near Calgary. They posted the location on Twitter and their website. Apparently someone from Calgary Expo discovered this and promptly had the expo’s security contact the police. Continue reading

Banning the brigade

So this happened yesterday:

With 97,000 attendees last year, this year’s Calgary Comic Expo – billed as the 2nd largest in Canada and the 4th largest in North America – should’ve been a blast for all the guests, exhibitors and visitors.

For one group promoting comic books and free expression, though, the trip turned into a humiliating nightmare – through no fault of their own.

Eight members of the women’s creative artistic group the Honey Badger Brigade (once located in space BF 3821 at the Expo) – Anna Cherry, Brian Martinez, Alison Tieman, Mike Stephenson (of YouTube channel DoctorRandomercam), Karen Straughan (GirlWritesWhat), Hannah Wallen, Sage Gerard, and Rachel Edwards – had their exhibitor’s booth shut down by security just before the doors opened to the public on Friday, April 17, the 2nd day of the 4-day exposition. They were then summarily ejected from the premises along with Alison’s husband and Anna’s companion – 10 ejections in all.

One leader of the cooperative group – comic producer Alison Tieman – was also blacklisted permanently from attending similar Comic Expositions across Canada, effectively destroying her ability to promote her art.

Their crime? Alison politely answered a question during a panel discussion.

The discussion can be heard below. It is clear from the audio that the discussion was civil. There were no threats, insults, or attacks. Continue reading

The slippery slope of reasoning

I am not a fan of slippery slope arguments. People tend to make them when dealing with sensitive topics. If the other side cannot be convinced by a basic argument, the speaker turns to the slippery slope argument. This play on extremes is meant to show the flaws in the other side’s position. Typically, however, it only shows how invested the speaker is in a given issue.

Yet sometimes there is a validity to the argument. Case in point: Indiana’s new religious freedom law. Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act into law early last week. The move prompted immediate outrage over the impression that the law allows people to discriminate against gay people under the guise of protecting religious rights. If someone belongs to a religion that opposes gay marriage and refuses to serve a gay couple, say by baking a wedding cake, the law protects the religious person from being sued.

That was not, however, how the law was taken. Both sides saw it is as a wholesale allowance of general discrimination. Many on the right would deny that, claiming that businesses could not discriminate against individual gay people. Yet that is not how some supporting the law responded.  Continue reading

The Darling Effect

I watched a BBC segment about sexism against men. The panel featured several feminists and non-feminists, including Milo Yiannopolous. It is an amazing thing to watch.

Despite the segment being about men and their issues, the feminists refused to allow any of the men to speak. They frequently interrupted the men, dismissing the men’s opinions about their own experiences while telling the men what it was they were actually experiencing. Of course, the feminists also followed this with a large helping of “women have it worse.”

What I found hilarious was the general condescending tone most of the feminists used. They came across as if they were doing men a favor by even listening to them. Sargon of Akkad has a fantastic take down of the round table, and he repeatedly makes the same point. Continue reading

A Difficult Marriage

I came across an article written by a woman raised by lesbian mothers. Heather Barwick argued in her piece that while she supports the gay community, she no longer supports gay marriage. She stated:

Growing up, and even into my 20s, I supported and advocated for gay marriage. It’s only with some time and distance from my childhood that I’m able to reflect on my experiences and recognize the long-term consequences that same-sex parenting had on me. And it’s only now, as I watch my children loving and being loved by their father each day, that I can see the beauty and wisdom in traditional marriage and parenting.Same-sex marriage and parenting withholds either a mother or father from a child while telling him or her that it doesn’t matter. That it’s all the same. But it’s not. A lot of us, a lot of your kids, are hurting. My father’s absence created a huge hole in me, and I ached every day for a dad. I loved my mom’s partner, but another mom could never have replaced the father I lost.

According to Barwick, her mother married her father essentially to fit in. However, Barwick’s mother eventually came out, divorced her father, and found a woman to share her life with. Barwick’s father “wasn’t a great guy” and after her mother “left him he didn’t bother coming around anymore.”

That is a poor reason for failing to support gay marriage. Continue reading

The Shaming of a “Feminazi”

Jessica Valenti wrote another article about why feminists do not hate men but if they did it would not matter. I am not going to link to it. That is not only because I have no desire to fall for her click bait, but also because I found something funnier.

Rush Limbaugh coined the term “feminazi” years ago during one of his (I assume) drug-fueled rants. It is not a term I favor as it fails to properly convey the idiocy, ineptitude, and perpetual victim mentality of modern feminism. However, I must give Limbaugh some credit (and yes, I just spat for having even written those words): it actually does not take much to make feminists sounds like Nazis.

Some wonderful men’s rights activist got the idea to run Valenti’s “I don’t hate men but I really do” article through a Firefox add-on and replaced every mention of “men” with “Jew” and feminist with “Aryan.” The result: Continue reading