Arizona to force child rape victim to pay child support

Eight years ago, a 20-year-old woman raped then 14-year-old Nick Olivas. Arizona law states that no child under 14 can consent to sex with an adult. Legally, this makes the sexual encounter rape, however, Olivas never considered reporting the crime. Instead, he finished high school, attended college, and became a medical assistant. Two years ago, the woman made a reappearance:

Then two years ago, the state served him with papers demanding child support. That’s how he found out he had a then-6-year-old daughter.

“It was a shock,” he said. “I was living my life and enjoying being young. To find out you have a 6-year-old? It’s unexplainable. It freaked me out.”

He said he panicked, ignored the legal documents and never got the required paternity test. The state eventually tracked him down.

Olivas, a 24-year-old Phoenix resident, said he now owes about $15,000 in back child support and medical bills going back to the child’s birth, plus 10 percent interest. The state seized money from his bank account and is now garnisheeing his wages at $380 a month.

This is not the first time a male victim of child rape has been forced to pay his rapist. The article recounts two other instances: Continue reading

Bulletin Board v218

Brave Worcester man who was raped speaks out — A COURAGEOUS father has spoken of his rape ordeal in the hope other male survivors of sex attacks will come forward. Pete Shirley, of Bromyard Road, St John’s, Worcester, refuses to let the attack destroy him and hopes that by waiving his legal right to anonymity he will encourage other men to report rape.

CAPS offering Male Survivors therapeutic support group this spring — Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at Penn State is offering a group this spring for male students who have had unwanted, abusive or confusing sexual experiences at some point in their lives, which may still be affecting them.

Editorial: The war on young boys — The Obama Administration, through Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and U S. Attorney general Eric Holder, have issued new guidelines designed to end or at least restrict “zero tolerance” disciplinary policies in schools. Continue reading