Bulletin Board v306

Addressing the Lack of Research on Male Childhood Sexual Abuse — On Thursday July 20, fans across the world mourned the loss of Chester Bennington, the lead vocalist for the world-renowned band, Linkin Park. Bennington’s suicide by hanging at the age of 41 stunned fans, but it also brought to light a rarely discussed topic: male childhood sexual abuse. One in six boys are sexually abused before the age of 16—yet the issue remains underreported, undertreated, and highly stigmatized.

Court: Juvenile sex crimes can be basis of civil commitment — Civil commitment of offenders who have been designated as sexually violent predators can be indefinitely extended for those whose crimes occurred when they were juveniles, the Washington Supreme Court unanimously ruled Thursday.

Fear of being called racist ‘stopping people from raising child abuse concerns’ — Potential cases of child abuse are not being raised because people fear being labelled racist, a Labour frontbencher has argued. There is a need to acknowledge that the “majority of perpetrators have been British-Pakistani” in the towns and cities where grooming gangs have targeted girls, Sarah Champion has said. Continue reading

College rape culture and the death of due process

Christina Hoff Sommers interviewed Stuart Taylor. Taylor authored the book The Campus Rape Frenzy, which details the feminist claim of a “rape epidemic” on college campuses and their attempt to roll back due process for students accused of rape.

Taylor highlights in the interview the myriad ways in which the due process of students are violated in an attempt to peddle the feminist agenda. He highlights that these new “listen and believe” rules do not apply to male victims. A male student claiming rape have little chance of his claim being taken seriously. If the both parties are intoxicated and the male claims rape, Taylor suggests that this would be taken as a malicious counter claim and dismissed.

More worrisome is the presumption of guilt. Accused students are not afforded council, not allowed to the see the evidence against them, not allowed to cross examine witnesses, not allowed to present witnesses, and often are not informed of the complaints until the process is well underway. This forces the accused to prove their innocence, something that is a clear violation of constitutional law. Continue reading

The power of a false accusation

When I was a child, my grandfather told me a story about a boy.

The boy went to visit relatives. While he was with his cousins, he noticed a woman. The boy whistled at the woman. The woman took offense and told some of her male relatives about it. Those men sought the boy, found him, and tortured him to death. His body was so mutilated that it was difficult to identify him. The boy’s mother had an open casket for his funeral so that people could see what the men had done to her 14-year-old son. The men were found, charged, and taken to trial, but were acquitted. They later admitted that they had killed the boy.

The boy’s name was Emmett Till.

I asked my grandfather why they killed the boy for whistling at the woman. He told me it was because the boy was black and the woman was white. I was about five or six when he told me about Emmett Till. I found it baffling. I could not understand what being black or white had to do with the whistling. My grandfather tried to explain the racial dynamics, but I still could not understand why it mattered.

However, I did understand one thing: the woman probably lied.

Perhaps it was the way my grandfather told me story or perhaps it was just the nature of what he described. As he explained the racial dynamics of the 1950s, the more I thought the woman lied. It turns out that my childhood assumption was true. Continue reading

Ending the statute of limitations on sexual abuse cases

The statute of limitations in sexual abuse cases presents a problem for prosecutors. Many states limit the time a person has to report the abuse. The limits vary from state to state, yet they generally end within 10 years of the victim turning 18. This creates a confounding situation because many victims wait years to report the abuse. It is also troublesome in that each state varies how the law works.

In some states, the limitation is based on the last incident of abuse. In others, it is based on the person’s age. Illinois, where I live, uses the latter. The law currently states that people have until they are 38 to file a complaint, but only if they were born after 1981. This limit was removed to an extent in 2013. It now allows sex crimes against children to be reported at any time, however, this only applies if someone already reported the abuse or if there is evidence supporting the accusation.

The logic behind getting rid of the limitations is simple, as the Chicago Tribune explains: Continue reading

Bulletin Board v294

British man prosecuted after confronting priest who abused him as a boy — A British man who says he was abused by a Catholic missionary almost 50 years ago is being prosecuted in the Italian courts after he travelled to Verona to forgive his abuser. Mark Murray (60) was one of 11 men who settled out of court with the Comboni missionary order for abuse suffered during the 1960s and 1970s at Mirfield in Yorkshire. They received sums of between £7,000 and £30,000, paid by the order.

Do western feminists view the rest of the world differently? — Dear western feminists, As a woman raised in Afghanistan, I cringe when I type the word “western”. I know that the experience of being a woman in this world is fundamentally the same. When I write “western”, I don’t write it because I believe that you are physically different to me. After all, what better evidence is there for our basic common humanity as women than breast cancer? The disease has no respect for our ethnic or cultural particularities. It attacks all of us equally, with the indiscriminate force of universality.

Female Sing Sing guard admits to raping male inmate — A former corrections officer at Sing Sing Correctional Facility admitted Tuesday to raping an inmate while on the job in May 2015, according to authorities. Evita Hinds, 35, of Queens, pleaded guilty to one count of third degree rape, a class E felony. She faces up to four years in state prison when she is sentenced in October, Acting Westchester County District Attorney James A. McCarty said in a news release. Continue reading

The tangled web of lies from UVA’s Jackie unravel

Thanks to a current lawsuit against Rolling Stone magazine, more information about the UVA accuser Jackie Coakley made news. According to current reports, Coakley concocted a fake persona and lied about the gang rape in order to woo one of her male friends (one of the young men she later claimed told her not to seek help after she was “raped”):

In the filing, Eramo’s lawyers submitted new data from Yahoo concerning an e-mail account linked to “Haven Monahan,” the man Jackie identified to friends as the perpetrator of her assault. An investigation by the Charlottesville Police revealed that no person by that name has ever been a student at U-Va., and Eramo’s lawyers have presented evidence in court documents indicating that he is a figment of Jackie’s imagination.

Ryan Duffin, a student who knew Jackie at U-Va., told The Washington Post that he believed that the character was created by Jackie in an effort to attract Duffin’s romantic interest, a tactic known as “catfishing.”

Catfishing is when a person creates a fake persona online. It is sometimes used to trick another person into a romantic relationship, usually directly, but in this instance it was an attempt at causing jealously. It did not work. It appears that Duffin had no interest in Coakley. However, that did not stop the latter from trying: Continue reading

When false accusations take their toll

A feminist once stated about false accusations

“The accused would have a rough period. He might be suspended from his job; friends might de-friend him on Facebook. In the case of Bill Cosby, we might have to stop watching, consuming his books, or buying tickets to his traveling stand-up routine. These errors can be undone by an investigation that clears the accused, especially if it is done quickly.”

I wonder if she would apply that logic to Matthew Green. He went missing in 2010. This followed a tumultuous time he experienced dealing with a false accusation of rape. According to reports:

Matthew was investigated by police following an allegation of rape made by a girl, then aged 16.

Police surrounded his home and he spent 10 hours in custody as officers investigated the case.

But video footage taken from CCTV cameras showed that Matthew was at a petrol station in east London at time the alleged attack took place some 40 miles away in his hometown of Sittingbourne.

The girl then admitted her story was a complete fabrication and police dropped the case against Matthew.

His father Jim said today: ‘I think after everything that happened, it pushed him to the limit. From that time [his arrest] the boy we knew as outgoing, football and girls mad – he seemed to just stop.

‘From that he was never the same. Police officers came round to apologise after, I said look at that young boy. That’s what you’ve done to that young lad.

‘He became very withdrawn. His social life just went to nil. He packed up playing football, he wouldn’t go out. He began isolating himself in his bedroom and ate meals upstairs.’

Green turned to drugs and alcohol, ending up in a severe cycle of drug abuse prior to going missing. He remained missing for six years, and was recently discovered living in Spain. He reportedly is in psychiatric care refusing treatment. Continue reading