Support male victims on International Men’s Day

Today is November 17th, International Men’s Day. There will be plenty of articles from feminists bashing the focus on men’s issues. There will be plenty of articles from feminists claiming men’s issues are important, but not that serious. They will be plenty of articles from feminists giving lip service men’s issues.

What they are not going to do is offer support to men. In light of that, this post will include links to various organizations that assist men and boys. If anyone has any organizations that help men and boys, please leave them in the comments below and I will add them to the list. I do ask people check the organizations before adding them. Having gender neutral language on their site is not enough. It is important to make sure that the organization actively assists men and boys.

1 in 6
The Innocence Project
The Campaign Against Living Miserably
Just Detention International
Living Well
MaleSurvivor
ManKind UK
Survivors UK
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests
Urban Light

Stop The Abuse: 1 in 6

Often times people want to help others but do not know how. This cannot be any truer than when it comes to helping abused men and boys. The resources sometimes are not apparent and are often difficult to find. Sometimes the resources are hidden or even barred by other groups who wish to polarize the issue. The intent here is to provide those who wish to help male victims with the opportunity to do so.

Please remember that you do no have to empty your wallets to help. Even a small donation can go a long way. And for those on the other side of the issue, it would go a long way to demonstrating real concern for all victims if you donated as well.

———

1 in 6

Our Mission

The mission of 1in6 is to help men who have had unwanted or abusive sexual experiences in childhood live healthier, happier lives.

Our mission also includes serving family members, friends, and partners by providing information and support resources on the web and in the community.

Why 1in6?

Researchers estimate that 1 in 6 men have experienced unwanted or abusive sexual experiences before age 16. This is likely a low estimate, since it doesn’t include noncontact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects.

If you’ve had such an experience, or think you might have, you are not alone.

If you wonder whether such an experience may be connected to some difficulties or challenges in your life now, you are not alone.

Our Work

We offer outreach, education and services, in person and over the web, to men with histories of unwanted or abusive childhood sexual experiences and anyone who cares about them. We also provide professional trainings.

Please donate and help make a difference.

Help Restore the Anchor House

Back in April I wrote about the Anchor House. It is an organization that takes in trafficked boys. The group faced a backlash from the community as the people living near the group’s chosen location feared the boys would be violent. The Anchor House did find a location and manage to find funding as well.

I do have a criticism of the group, which is that they are a religious group. While it does not appear that they force Christianity onto any of the children, it is part of their platform. I do not see the need to inject religion into the situation. Nevertheless, the Anchor House is one of the few organizations that assists male victims of human trafficking, and I think people should support them.

This more necessary now, as the location was devastated by hurricane Matthew. The home was due to open in March 2017. Given the level of water damage, that has been delayed. Worse, the group’s flood insurance did not apply as they were still within the waiting period. They estimate it will take $80,000 to repair the damage.

The Anchor House has a GoFundMe fundraiser to try to cover the damage. They are hoping to raise $30,000, and the time of writing this they are at $5,745. I encourage people to support fundraiser. Any amount you can spare can help. Donate the money for your daily cup of coffee, a movie night, or that video game you already know will suck.

If you can, please donate. It is for a very good cause, one that rarely gets any attention.

The Honey Badgers interview Justin Trottier of CAFE

The Honey Badgers interviewed Justin Trottier, the spokesman for the Canadian Association for Equality (CAFE). I have followed CAFE for some time. They appear to do great work in helping men and boys in Canada, from creating services for fathers to pushing for increased recognition of male victims of abuse. CAFE initially received hostile responses from Canadian feminists, many of who mobbed any conference or talks CAFE gave on college campuses. The organization also faced bans and blocks from speaking at certain events, including being barred from a gay pride parade the group previously marched in.

The bulk of the complaints about the group hinge on the group’s focus on men’s issues, which their critics label as “misogynistic”, often without providing any evidence of a sexist view of women. It is a rather bizarre situation in which an organization attempting to help men essentially faces attacks for doing the very thing its critics claim no men’s rights group ever does: actually try to create services for men and boys. Continue reading

Police Training for Domestic Violence with Donald Dutton

Dr. Donald Dutton, Professor of Psychology at UBC, discusses in this video the current domestic violence policies and how they affect the way police respond to male victims.

Despite that the evidence showing that most domestic violence is reciprocal, meaning both partners abuse each other, the focus is exclusively on male-on-female violence. Dutton notes that when one looks at the data, the amount of violence suffered by women compared to men is only slightly higher. The focus on women as victims appears to be more political than evidence based.

The impact of this politicization is that male victims are often treated as abusers or ignored rather than helped. Many abuse support services will refuse to help men or refer them to batterer programs. Police in several countries will arrest the men regardless of who initiated the abuse. The net affect is that men are less likely to report the abuse out of fear of arrest or disbelief. Continue reading

Christopher Anderson Leads MaleSurvivor to Assist Abused Males

Tom Hodson interviewed Christopher Anderson, the executive director of MaleSurvivor. The interview covers a variety of issues related to male victimization, including the lack of services, the support MaleSurvivor provides, and the stigmas male victims face.

What I like about Anderson’s approach is that he does not focus on being a victim. He prefers to use the term “trauma”, which is a clever way of getting around the problem of recognizing men’s experiences of sexual violence. Many people, including men who were abused, do not view those acts as “rape” or “molestation”. They do not see themselves as “victims”. Using any of those terms could result in men side-stepping their issues. By calling it “trauma”, it makes almost clinical and medical. That may offer some men an easier means of accepting what happened to them without needing to view themselves as “victims”. Continue reading

Stop The Abuse: 1in6 Canada

Often times people want to help others but do not know how. This cannot be any truer than when it comes to helping abused men and boys. The resources sometimes are not apparent and are often difficult to find. Sometimes the resources are hidden or even barred by other groups who wish to polarize the issue. The intent here is to provide those who wish to help male victims with the opportunity to do so. Every month I will post a new link to an organization that provides services for male victims. As the list grows, I will create a page where all the links can be found.

Please remember that you do no have to empty your wallets to help. Even a small donation can go a long way. And for those on the other side of the issue, it would go a long way to demonstrating real concern for all victims if you donated as well.

——

1in6 Canada

Let’s get this out of the way right now.

If you are a man who was sexually abused as a child or sexually assaulted as an adult, you are not alone, you are not to blame and the feelings and thoughts you are having are normal.

More importantly, healing and a better life are possible—you, your family and your friends need to know that. And finding that help may be just a click away.

Please donate and help make a difference.