Few male military sexual assault victims come forward

Posted on December 10, 2014

Male victims of sexual violence remain a largely hidden in society. While the media gives more attention to the issue of male victimization than before, many men and boys continue to remain silent. This is particularly true of men in the military.

Despite representing the majority of rape victims, assaulted men are significantly less likely to seek help or report their assaults:

According to an anonymous survey released last week by the Pentagon, nearly 1 percent of males in the U.S. military said they had experienced unwanted sexual contact, compared to 4.3 percent of women. That equates to about 10,500 men and 8,500 women. Yet only 14 percent of assaults reported last year involved male victims.

Afraid to be seen as victims or as weak or gay, men in the hyper-masculine military culture often don’t feel comfortable reaching out for help or reporting sexual assaults. Over the past year, though, the services have increased efforts to reach out to male victims, urging them to come forward so they can receive treatment and so officials can go after perpetrators.

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Stop the Abuse: One in Three Campaign

Often times people want to help others but do not know how. This cannot be any truer than when it comes to helping abused men and boys. The resources sometimes are not apparent and are often difficult to find. Sometimes the resources are hidden or even barred by other groups who wish to polarize the issue. The intent here is to provide those who wish to help male victims with the opportunity to do so. Every month I will post a new link to an organization that provides services for male victims. As the list grows, I will create a page where all the links can be found.

Please remember that you do no have to empty your wallets to help. Even a small donation can go a long way. And for those on the other side of the issue, it would go a long way to demonstrating real concern for all victims if you donated as well.

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One in Three Campaign

WHAT IS FAMILY VIOLENCE?

Family violence and abuse is a serious and deeply entrenched problem in Australia. It has significant impacts upon the lives of men, women and children. It knows no boundaries of gender, geography, socio-economic status, age, ability, sexual preference, culture, race or religion. Domestic violence (also known as intimate partner violence or IPV), and most elder abuse, child abuse and sexual abuse are all different forms of family violence. Thankfully reducing family violence against women and children has been firmly on the agendas of government for many years. Now is the time to move to the next, more sophisticated stage of tackling the problem: recognising men as victims as well.

AT LEAST ONE IN THREE VICTIMS ARE MALE

Contrary to common beliefs, up to One in Three victims of sexual assault and at least One in Three victims of family violence and abuse is male1 (perhaps as many as one in two – see our overview of research page). While many services have quite rightly been established over the past four decades to support female victims of family violence, the needs of male victims remain largely unmet. Historically government policies have been based on the assumption that the vast majority of perpetrators are male and the vast majority of victims are female, and the policies of current governments are still based on this erroneous position. Indeed, regretfully, the National Council to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children did not include male victims in their otherwise laudable March 2009 recommendations which have been enthusiastically supported by the federal government. Now is the time for action by politicians and community leaders to recognise that a comprehensive approach is required to combat the scourge of family violence.

Please donate and help make a difference.

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Acclaimed Durham headteacher Anne Lakey appears in court on boy abuse charges — An acclaimed headteacher has appeared in court charged with indecently assaulting a boy 25 years ago. Anne Lakey, 55, from Stanley, County Durham, had been lauded nationally for her work as chief executive of the Durham Federation of Schools after overseeing the biggest improvements in GCSE results in the country.

Englewood woman indicted on sex assault charges in alleged abuse of 5-year-old boy — An Englewood woman has been indicted on aggravated sexual assault charges in connection with the alleged abuse of 5-year-old boy. A grand jury in Hackensack returned a five-count indictment on Thursday against Roxanne Hewitt, 33. Police responded to Hewitt’s DuBois Court home in April after the victim’s mother reported that her son had been sexually assaulted, authorities said.

Man jailed for 20 years for sexually abusing young boys — A PAEDOPHILE who sexually assaulted three boys over a 20-year period – starting when he was aged just 10 or 11 – has been jailed for 20 years. Alexander Lake, 39, of East Cliff, Porthtowan, abused the boys, who cannot be named for legal reasons, between 1985 and 2008, in South Brent and Paignton, Truro Crown Court heard on Friday. Continue reading

UK government creates new fund for male rape victims

The United Kingdom has a sordid history of failing to acknowledge and address sexual violence against men and boys. Many cases of sexual violence against males are not prosecuted under the rape statutes, including offenses against boys. Women cannot face rape charges under UK law. The National Rape Crisis Network excludes organizations at assist male victims. All those things works against efforts to help abused men and boys.

However, the UK government recently decided to grant money to the Male Rape Support Fund:

Male victims of rape are to be supported with a new £600,000 government fund.

Twelve charities to be given money from the new Male Rape Support Fund were announced earlier by Victims Minister Mike Penning.

He said nationally about 75,000 men were victims of sexual assault in 2012-13, but few went to the police for help because the crime was “taboo”.

The fund will support the chosen charities over two years.

Its aim, announced by the Ministry of Justice in February, is to provide online information and face-to-face support at centres across England and Wales.

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Stop The Abuse: The Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women

Often times people want to help others but do not know how. This cannot be any truer than when it comes to helping abused men and boys. The resources sometimes are not apparent and are often difficult to find. Sometimes the resources are hidden or even barred by other groups who wish to polarize the issue. The intent here is to provide those who wish to help male victims with the opportunity to do so. Every month I will post a new link to an organization that provides services for male victims. As the list grows, I will create a page where all the links can be found.

Please remember that you do no have to empty your wallets to help. Even a small donation can go a long way. And for those on the other side of the issue, it would go a long way to demonstrating real concern for all victims if you donated as well.

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The Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women

The Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women (DAHMW) is a 501(c)(3) non profit organization, and is a member of the Maine Association of Nonprofits. DAHMW is at the forefront of today’s new perspectives on Intimate Partner Abuse and actively assists the research community.

OUR MISSION

To provide crisis intervention and support services to all victims of domestic violence and their families in order to help survivors recover from the trauma of domestic violence. We work toward the elimination of domestic violence by increasing public awareness and decreasing tolerance of domestic violence through community collaboration and education. DAHMW will strive to improve the quality and safety of the lives of victims who are seeking peace in their homes and in their daily existence.

Please donate and help make a difference.

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Campus Health does not offer equal support for male survivors — The University knows it can’t provide identical services for male and female survivors of sexual violence. But instead of providing equal resources for both groups, Counseling and Psychological Services has largely pushed the needs of male survivors off campus. There is only enough interest to run one sexual assault survivor group on campus, which is open to female-identified survivors.

The CDC’s Rape Numbers Are Misleading — “CDC: Nearly 1 in 5 Women Raped.” “One in Five U.S. Women Has Been Raped: CDC Survey.” These alarming headlines were typical of the coverage of last week’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report on sexual and intimate violence in the United States. The CDC study—the second in two years—seems to support a radical feminist narrative that has been gaining mainstream attention recently: that modern America is a “rape culture” saturated with misogynistic violence.

Men’s helpline gets 25,000 calls over four months — SIF, the mobile app launched five months ago for the protection of men’s rights, has received a mega response in the last four months. The app, launched by Save India Family Foundation NGO, has received 25,000 calls in the last four-five months. It was launched to help men at the receiving end of domestic violence or slapped with false rape cases with a dedicated helpline “08882498498”. Continue reading

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Callum Carson bravely breaks a social taboo by openly talking about being the victim of male rape — SCOTLAND has witnessed a steep increase in the number of rapes reported to police. But while this crime is often viewed as an attack on women, there are male victims too. It is rare for anyone to publicly share their experience of rape – particularly a man. Callum Carson, from Bathgate, waived his right to anonymity to share his story in a bid to raise the issue of male rape and highlight a system that he feels let him down.

Charge: Self-styled swim coach molested gravely ill boy at Seattle Children’s hospital — An Idaho man accused of sexually assaulting a seriously ill boy at Seattle Children’s hospital now faces a child molestation charge. A self-styled swim coach, John Hudspeth was caught by Children’s staff molesting the boy while he was being treated at the hospital, King County prosecutors say in charging papers. Hudspeth, a 63-year-old resident of St. Maries, Idaho, is alleged to have spent years grooming the boy for abuse prior to the sexual assaults.

Coventry rape centre launches counselling service for men — Coventry Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre has launched a counselling service for men. The project will provide specialist counselling to men who have experienced any form of rape or sexual abuse at any point in their lives. It will also help fathers and adult male siblings of abused children. CRASAC already supports younger males from the ages of five to 18, but in the past, there was no provision for adult men. Continue reading