Support Toronto DV Symposium

There are not many services for male victims in Canada. Those that do exist receive little attention from the government or media. One particular group is in need of funding

The The Canadian Maltese Charitable Service trust will be holding its second annual Domestic Violence symposium at Ryerson College in Toronto, Canada on June 5 & 6 from 9am to 6pm.

The event is needed to bridge a severe information gap. While hundreds of thousands of dollars are dedicated to promoting awareness of the plight and experiences of abused women and girls, little to nothing has been done to inform the public about abused men and boys.

According to the site, the event will cost  $10,000  to cover the venue, equipment, promotional materials, and speakers’ expenses. Attila Vinczer, the Executive Secretary of the organization, paid for the previous year’s fees. This year he will need an additional $3,000 to cover the costs.

The group is asking for donations. If you can, please donate and help the organization in its effort to bring awareness to domestic violence against men.

Stop The Abuse: 1 in 6

Often times people want to help others but do not know how. This cannot be any truer than when it comes to helping abused men and boys. The resources sometimes are not apparent and are often difficult to find. Sometimes the resources are hidden or even barred by other groups who wish to polarize the issue. The intent here is to provide those who wish to help male victims with the opportunity to do so.

Please remember that you do no have to empty your wallets to help. Even a small donation can go a long way. And for those on the other side of the issue, it would go a long way to demonstrating real concern for all victims if you donated as well.

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1 in 6

Our Mission

The mission of 1in6 is to help men who have had unwanted or abusive sexual experiences in childhood live healthier, happier lives.

Our mission also includes serving family members, friends, and partners by providing information and support resources on the web and in the community.

Why 1in6?

Researchers estimate that 1 in 6 men have experienced unwanted or abusive sexual experiences before age 16. This is likely a low estimate, since it doesn’t include noncontact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects.

If you’ve had such an experience, or think you might have, you are not alone.

If you wonder whether such an experience may be connected to some difficulties or challenges in your life now, you are not alone.

Our Work

We offer outreach, education and services, in person and over the web, to men with histories of unwanted or abusive childhood sexual experiences and anyone who cares about them. We also provide professional trainings.

Please donate and help make a difference.

Bulletin Board v261

Illiberal Feminism Is Running Amok — When men disagree with illiberal feminists, a favored silencing tactic is to accuse them of “mansplaining.” The term grew out of a fairly brilliant 2008 essay by feminist writer Rebecca Solnit, who described the exquisitely annoying feeling of having a certain type of man condescendingly lecture a woman on a topic about which he knows very little—in this case Solnit’s own book.

Men Can Be Raped Too: Expert Urges Government to Recognize Male Rape — For the sake of gender equality, Jia Jian, a legal expert lecturer at the Chongqing-based Southwest University of Political Science and Law, made a proposal last Monday that the Chinese government expand the Criminal Law’s definition of rape victims in order to include males.

National support for abused men — For the first time in New Zealand, a national structure has been set up specifically to support male survivors of sexual abuse. Members from regional support groups around the country gathered at a hui in Nelson and made a commitment to the body, which would be known as the Male Survivors of Sexual Abuse Trust Aotearoa New Zealand (MSSAT).

Sexual assault cases: ‘Nirbhaya’ centres to focus on young male victims — Growing increasingly aware of molestation and sexual assault of young boys, the civic body will soon set up ‘Nirbhaya’ centres that, apart from providing medico-legal, surgical and psychological counseling to women victims, will also specifically cater to adolescent boys who have been subjected to such assaults. Continue reading

Stop The Abuse: The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

Often times people want to help others but do not know how. This cannot be any truer than when it comes to helping abused men and boys. The resources sometimes are not apparent and are often difficult to find. Sometimes the resources are hidden or even barred by other groups who wish to polarize the issue. The intent here is to provide those who wish to help male victims with the opportunity to do so.

Please remember that you do no have to empty your wallets to help. Even a small donation can go a long way. And for those on the other side of the issue, it would go a long way to demonstrating real concern for all victims if you donated as well.

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The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

About NAPAC

We are the only national organisation focused on supporting adults who have been abused in any way as children. We know that most children who are abused don’t talk about it until they become adults and NAPAC exists to support survivors of child abuse when want to talk and receive support.

We aim to:

  1. Respond to the distress caused in adulthood by ill treatment and/or neglect in childhood.
  2. Establish a national information line and postal service for people requiring advice and information about help available to overcome the continuing impact of childhood abuse in adulthood.
  3. Provide support, training, information and resources to persons and organisations supporting people who have experienced ill treatment and/or neglect in childhood.
  4. Raise public awareness of the continuing impact of childhood abuse in adulthood.
  5. Effectively campaign to alleviate the impact of child abuse in adulthood.

We plan to achieve these aims by:

  • Continuing to run our national freephone Support Line for adults who have suffered any type of abuse during childhood.
  • The publication of helpful materials and information.
  • Establishing training packages for people and organisations supporting survivors.
  • The establishment, maintenance and monitoring of a national register of counsellors and therapists who are committed to assisting adults who have experienced child abuse
  • Organising seminars and conferences on relevant topics
  • Promoting and liaising with relevant bodies on issues pertaining to childhood abuse and its continuing impact in adulthood

Please donate and help make a difference.

Few male military sexual assault victims come forward

Posted on December 10, 2014

Male victims of sexual violence remain a largely hidden in society. While the media gives more attention to the issue of male victimization than before, many men and boys continue to remain silent. This is particularly true of men in the military.

Despite representing the majority of rape victims, assaulted men are significantly less likely to seek help or report their assaults:

According to an anonymous survey released last week by the Pentagon, nearly 1 percent of males in the U.S. military said they had experienced unwanted sexual contact, compared to 4.3 percent of women. That equates to about 10,500 men and 8,500 women. Yet only 14 percent of assaults reported last year involved male victims.

Afraid to be seen as victims or as weak or gay, men in the hyper-masculine military culture often don’t feel comfortable reaching out for help or reporting sexual assaults. Over the past year, though, the services have increased efforts to reach out to male victims, urging them to come forward so they can receive treatment and so officials can go after perpetrators.

Continue reading

Stop the Abuse: One in Three Campaign

Often times people want to help others but do not know how. This cannot be any truer than when it comes to helping abused men and boys. The resources sometimes are not apparent and are often difficult to find. Sometimes the resources are hidden or even barred by other groups who wish to polarize the issue. The intent here is to provide those who wish to help male victims with the opportunity to do so. Every month I will post a new link to an organization that provides services for male victims. As the list grows, I will create a page where all the links can be found.

Please remember that you do no have to empty your wallets to help. Even a small donation can go a long way. And for those on the other side of the issue, it would go a long way to demonstrating real concern for all victims if you donated as well.

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One in Three Campaign

WHAT IS FAMILY VIOLENCE?

Family violence and abuse is a serious and deeply entrenched problem in Australia. It has significant impacts upon the lives of men, women and children. It knows no boundaries of gender, geography, socio-economic status, age, ability, sexual preference, culture, race or religion. Domestic violence (also known as intimate partner violence or IPV), and most elder abuse, child abuse and sexual abuse are all different forms of family violence. Thankfully reducing family violence against women and children has been firmly on the agendas of government for many years. Now is the time to move to the next, more sophisticated stage of tackling the problem: recognising men as victims as well.

AT LEAST ONE IN THREE VICTIMS ARE MALE

Contrary to common beliefs, up to One in Three victims of sexual assault and at least One in Three victims of family violence and abuse is male1 (perhaps as many as one in two – see our overview of research page). While many services have quite rightly been established over the past four decades to support female victims of family violence, the needs of male victims remain largely unmet. Historically government policies have been based on the assumption that the vast majority of perpetrators are male and the vast majority of victims are female, and the policies of current governments are still based on this erroneous position. Indeed, regretfully, the National Council to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children did not include male victims in their otherwise laudable March 2009 recommendations which have been enthusiastically supported by the federal government. Now is the time for action by politicians and community leaders to recognise that a comprehensive approach is required to combat the scourge of family violence.

Please donate and help make a difference.

Bulletin Board v247

Acclaimed Durham headteacher Anne Lakey appears in court on boy abuse charges — An acclaimed headteacher has appeared in court charged with indecently assaulting a boy 25 years ago. Anne Lakey, 55, from Stanley, County Durham, had been lauded nationally for her work as chief executive of the Durham Federation of Schools after overseeing the biggest improvements in GCSE results in the country.

Englewood woman indicted on sex assault charges in alleged abuse of 5-year-old boy — An Englewood woman has been indicted on aggravated sexual assault charges in connection with the alleged abuse of 5-year-old boy. A grand jury in Hackensack returned a five-count indictment on Thursday against Roxanne Hewitt, 33. Police responded to Hewitt’s DuBois Court home in April after the victim’s mother reported that her son had been sexually assaulted, authorities said.

Man jailed for 20 years for sexually abusing young boys — A PAEDOPHILE who sexually assaulted three boys over a 20-year period – starting when he was aged just 10 or 11 – has been jailed for 20 years. Alexander Lake, 39, of East Cliff, Porthtowan, abused the boys, who cannot be named for legal reasons, between 1985 and 2008, in South Brent and Paignton, Truro Crown Court heard on Friday. Continue reading