Hiding in Plain Sight: The Female Sexual Predator

What does it say about our society when we are only acknowledging the reality of female sexual perpetrators at the end of 2016?

As much as I detest the “it’s the current year” argument, I feel it is applicable in this instance. Despite all the progress made in victim advocacy in the last thirty years, we still hesitate to admit that women commit sexual violence. The hesitation comes in part from cultural norms about women’s capacity for violence, in part from assumptions about male victimization, and in part from a political movement that frames sexual violence as a “gendered” crime.

I have written numerous times about female sex offenders. While the topic receives less media and scholarly attention, there are plenty of studies showing the prevalence of female sexual perpetration. I previously noted that if one looks at these studies in chronological order, the reported rate of female perpetration, particularly against male victims, increases over time. The more we study the topic, the more obvious it becomes that not only do women commit sexual violence, but that they represent the majority of people who sexually assault men and boys.

As shown above, none of this information is new. I pieced it together without access to scholarly publications. Other advocates, men’s rights activists, and even feminists have done the same. The information is scattered and somewhat limited, yet it is not hard to find.

It is simply not discussed. Continue reading

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80.9% of sex convicts in Lagos prisons abused during childhood — At least, 80.9 percent of sex convicts and inmates awaiting trial for sexual and gender based violence in Lagos prisons have been abused during childhood, a recent report has revealed. The report, conducted by the Lagos State Domestic and Sexual Response Team, DSVRT, revealed that due to the early abuse, the inmates had been sexually active, leading to sexual offences being committed by them.

Archdiocese of Ottawa paid former altar boy $50,000 after sex abuse allegations — More than a decade before the Archdiocese of Ottawa told Jacques Faucher he could no longer be a priest, it paid tens of thousands of dollars to a former altar boy who had accused the reverend of molesting him. Faucher was convicted in March of historical sex offences against three other children, but newly obtained documents by the Sun show the diocese wrote a $50,000 cheque to a former altar boy when he was an adult in 1998, more than a year after he told the church about the alleged sexual abuse.

Denver man freed after 28 years in prison acquitted of rape — A Denver man who spent more than a quarter of a century in prison for a rape he long denied committing was acquitted of the crime on Monday, leaving a courtroom to applause from supporters and chants of “it’s over.” Clarence Moses-EL, 60, was freed in December, after a judge overturned his 1988 conviction on rape and assault charges and found that he would likely be acquitted if his case went to trial again. Continue reading

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Dogged determination delivers justice for victims caught up in 20 year web of sexual abuse — Shame. Guilt. Fear. Anger. This is the impact sexual abuse has on its victims. Some of the young men molested by Taranaki man Nigel Allan Hauauru Nelson feigned sleep, froze or blocked out their feelings, using drugs and alcohol as a means to cope. Others chose to lock it away and not talk to police at all. But thanks to the efforts of New Plymouth Detective Pat Tongi and his team, Nelson will be held accountable for the harm he caused to 14 men.

Ex-police officer abused two boys at offenders’ centre, court told — A retired police superintendent sexually abused two boys in the 1980s when he ran an attendance centre for young offenders, a jury has been told. Gordon Anglesea, 78, a former officer with North Wales police, abused the boys when they were 14 or 15, the court heard. The first alleged victim claims that he was assaulted by Anglesea in the showers and a changing room of the centre in Wrexham, north Wales.

Families apologize after more sex abuse details surface against dead Minnesota teacher, spouse — The families of South St. Paul teacher Aric Babbitt and his husband spoke publicly Wednesday for the first time about alleged sexual abuse of teen boys made against the couple before they turned up dead last week in Washington of an apparent murder-suicide.When reached by the Pioneer Press at his South St. Paul home, Babbitt’s father read a statement he said was prepared on behalf of his family and Matthew Deyo’s family. Continue reading

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Elementary School Teacher Killed in Apparent Murder-Suicide May Have Abused Multiple Kids: Reports — A Minnesota elementary school teacher and his husband, who were found dead last week in an apparent murder-suicide in Washington state, may have sexually abused multiple underage boys, according to reports. Aric Babbitt, 40, and Matthew Deyo, 36, were reportedly found dead on Lopez Island on Aug. 25, just two weeks after one of Babbitt’s former students went to police and accused him of sexual assault.

Exposed: UP’s hell prison where inmates suffer vicious torture and corruption — The crime team of India Today has unearthed a prison that has turned into a vicious hub of third-degree torture, abuse and corruption. Here, an inmate is pinned down on the ground, with his feet up and locked in bamboo sticks by fellow prisoners. Unbearable screams pierce through the large hall as a deputy jailer unleashes a flurry of club blows on his bare soles.

Family of malnourished boy found dead in Echo Park closet had been reported to social workers six times — Days apart in 2012, two teachers contacted the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services about a young boy named Yonatan Daniel Aguilar. One reported that the boy was suffering from general neglect. Another said he had a black eye. County social workers interviewed school employees, including a soccer coach and a special education teacher. Continue reading

Male prison rape survivors speak out

Originally posted on May 20, 2015

Prison rape remains a major issue in the United States. Despite the Prison Rape Elimination Act passing several years ago, states do little to reform their prison systems. Texas Governor Rick Perry has even refused to implement the changes suggested by the act.

Yet that inaction pales in comparison to how other countries view prison rape. Many countries do not acknowledge it occurs. Those that do often do nothing to curb the assaults. This is particularly true in countries where social norms prevent victims from coming forward. Such is the case in South Africa. Fortunately, there is a new effort to raise awareness:

South African prisons are notorious the world over for their endemic sexual abuse. Despite this, prisoner rape is not well understood by the South African public and government, and does not receive the serious attention it urgently needs. This is according to a report compiled by Emily Nagisa Keehn, policy development and advocacy manager at Sonke Gender Justice and Sasha Gear, programme director at Just Detention International, South Africa.

Sonke, Just Detention International – South Africa, and NICRO have partnered to increase public awareness of sexual abuse in prison. Three men came forward to share their stories about surviving rape in prison. Vincent*, Francois and Thabo* are the first South African survivors of prisoner rape to tell their stories in this way.

The three men’s stories can be viewed below. Continue reading

Dylan Voller’s mother regrets calling police

I recently wrote about the torture juvenile inmate Dylan Voller suffered in an Australian juvenile detention center. The story went viral and spawned an investigation into the abuse committed in the detention center. It also prompted protests against the torture and  international condemnation.

While some responded to the news stories with outrage, many were unsympathetic to Dylan’s abuse. They argued that Dylan either would not have been in the position to be abused or somehow deserved as a result of his criminal behavior. I noted in my first post that Dylan Voller is hardly an angel. He has been in and out of jail since he was 12, and his most recent crime involved a drug-fueled crime spree culminating in a violent assault.

Yet much of prison abuse happened prior to that crime spree. It also appears that outside of that last offense the worst Dylan has done is throw things at people, break objects, spit at guards, and threaten to hurt himself. None of those appear to justify the cruelty the guards used against Dylan.

They do, however, hint at a broader issue with Dylan. It is one that I suspected as I watched the videos of the guards abusing him. Dylan’s mother confirmed my suspicions in a recent interview. Joanne Voller told reports that she now regrets calling the authorities on her son.

She explained that Dylan attended at least five different schools in three years due to his behavior. She eventually contacted the NT Department of Children and Families services after her son broke a window. They told her that her son would receive the help he needed if she reported him. Instead, Dylan ended up in spending more time in jail than outside. Joanne stated: Continue reading

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Head of Australian prison abuse inquiry quits, replaced by aboriginal leader — The head of an Australian inquiry into the abuse of children in detention resigned on Monday, four days after being appointed to investigate prison video of aboriginal boys being abused, citing his lack of support from the country’s indigenous leaders. The Royal Commission will now be conducted by two commissioners, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner Mick Gooda and retired Supreme Court judge Margaret White, Attorney-General George Brandis said Monday.

Former LA Sheriff Baca Withdraws Guilty Plea to Test Fate with Jury — Former Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca withdrew his guilty plea to a federal corruption charge today and will go to trial, with a court date tentatively set for September. After a morning of delays and last-minute negotiations, Baca told U.S. District Judge Percy Anderson he wished to withdraw from an agreement in which the retired lawman had pleaded guilty to a false statements charge, which ordinarily carries a possible five-year prison sentence. The plea deal called for Baca to serve no more than six months behind bars.

The Men’s Rights Movement: A Smart, Necessary Counterweight To Man-Hating Feminism — At the start of July, the second International Conference on Men’s issues was held at the ExCel centre in London, two years after the inaugural conference in Detroit. Jointly hosted by A Voice for Men and the British political party Justice for Men and Boys, men from all around the world flocked to the centre to hear people discuss real issues that affected them. Continue reading