Bulletin Board v300

Charity highlights male domestic abuse victims — Brian Hitchcock, who runs Coventry-based charity Men’s Aid, says men who suffer violence at the hands of wives and girlfriends have been left out of a new £700,000 programme. The ‘violence perpetrator programme’ which will cover the entire West Midlands, will target husbands and boyfriends who commit domestic violence and abuse.

Chris Johnson: Nebraska must address gender bias — The Nebraska legal system suffers from widespread gender bias against men. While gender bias against fathers in family law cases is well documented, anti-male bias in other areas is less well known. According to the largest-ever review of domestic violence research, women and men abuse their partners at comparable rates.

Group Exhumes Boy’s Casket After Almost 100 Years, Is Shocked When They Open It — When forensic analysts and Pennsylvania state police gathered at the site of a nearly 90-year-old grave to dig out the body of teenager Thomas Curry, the anthropologists believed they would find clues as to why the boy died. Instead, they were left with more questions. The scientists didn’t find the boy’s body, but instead discovered layers of wood. The wood seemed to provide weight as if to hold the body or prevent it from moving. Continue reading

Top Posts of 2016

Due to a variety of reasons, I have not been as active on the blog as I wished. I hope to change that next year. Below are the top posts of 2016. These posts only include articles written in 2016.

On a side note, let us hope we can make it through the final hours of 2016 without any other beloved figures, musicians, or artists dying. Continue reading

Austrian court issues same sentence in Iraqi rape case retrial

I wrote previously about a rape case in Austria involving an Iraqi refugee. Amir A. claimed that he experienced a “sexual emergency” while at a swimming pool. In response, he snatched a random boy, took him to a stall, and raped the child. Amir then returned to the diving board as if nothing had happened. When police approached him, Amir admitted to the rape, claiming that he had not had sex in months and “[…]couldn’t stand not having sex as [he had] excess sexual energy.”

Amir was later convicted on sexual assault and faced six years in jail. However, in October the Austrian Supreme Court overturned the conviction, claiming:

[…] that while the verdict was “watertight” with regard to the serious sexual abuse of a juvenile, the written verdict on the second indictment, rape, cannot be sufficiently proved.

According to the Supreme Court, the first court should have ascertained whether the offender had thought that the victim agreed to the sexual act and whether Amir A. had the intention to act against the will of the boy.

As I noted in that post, one would think that would be clear by the boy seeking out help and informing the authorities that Amir assaulted him that the boy did not give his consent. One would also think that would be apparent from Amir’s admission to the crime and that the government awarded monetary compensation to the victim’s family.

Apparently that was not the case. Continue reading

Male victims share their stories about female rapists

Crimes make people uncomfortable. They particularly irk people whenever victims describe what happened to them. I think, however, that people sometimes need to be uncomfortable. People need to hear what happens. As much as those stories may ruin a person’s day, I think it is important to understand how experiencing those things can potentially ruin a person’s life.

This is all the more important when it comes to taboo topics like female sex offenders. People avoid the topic for a variety of reasons. In turn, victims of female abusers learn to keep the experiences to themselves. The only people this helps are female sexual predators. It does nothing to help the public understand how these women operate. It certainly does not help the victims who suffer in silence.

A recent article presented the stories of several men abused by women. Continue reading

The Reality of Child Trafficking Rings

Sargon of Akkad created a video about child sex trafficking rings. He did so in response to some readers insisting that he cover “Pizzagate”. Pizzagate is an internet conspiracy theory suggesting that Hillary Clinton and some of her aides operated a child sex trafficking ring out of a pizzeria. The accusation and wild reactions online led to an armed man taking it upon himself to investigate the Comet Ping Pong Pizzeria.

The accusations about child rape appear to be false. There is no evidence showing that anyone involved with the pizzeria committed any sex offense, let alone that they run a child sex ring or that Clinton is involved in any way.

Sargon argues in his video that some people have responded to this lack of evidence by saying that this sort of child sex ring simply cannot happen. He lists a number of well-investigated examples showing that to be false. Continue reading

Catholic church accused of using ‘mafia-like’ tactics to fight sex abuse bill

Is anyone surprised that the Catholic Church attempted to subvert legislation that would allow victims of abuse more time to sue their abusers?

The lobbying campaign against the legislation is being led by Philadelphia archbishop Charles Chaput, a staunch conservative who recently created a stir after inadvertently sending an email to a state representative Jamie Santora, in which he accused the lawmaker of “betraying” the church and said Santora would suffer “consequences” for his support of the legislation. The email was also sent to a senior staff member in Chaput’s office, who was apparently the only intended recipient.

The email has infuriated some Catholic lawmakers, who say they voted their conscience in support of the legislation on behalf of sexual abuse victims. One Republican legislator, Mike Vereb, accused the archbishop of using mafia-style tactics.

“This mob boss approach of having legislators called out, he really went right up to the line,” Vereb told the Guardian. “He is going down a road that is frankly dangerous for the status of the church in terms of it being a non-profit.”

We can set aside the absurdity of the church’s non=profit status for the moment. The issue here is that the bill would allow victims to file claims until they are 50-years-old. It would appear to be retroactive, meaning that if a person would were prevented from filing a suit under law, which stops at 30-years-old, they could do it under the new law. If it passes, it opens the door for many new lawsuits, potentially costing the Catholic Church millions of dollars.

This obviously poses a problem for the Church, hence the opposition to the bill. However, what is unusual is the attack on the legislators themselves. According to the article: Continue reading

Hiding in Plain Sight: The Female Sexual Predator

What does it say about our society when we are only acknowledging the reality of female sexual perpetrators at the end of 2016?

As much as I detest the “it’s the current year” argument, I feel it is applicable in this instance. Despite all the progress made in victim advocacy in the last thirty years, we still hesitate to admit that women commit sexual violence. The hesitation comes in part from cultural norms about women’s capacity for violence, in part from assumptions about male victimization, and in part from a political movement that frames sexual violence as a “gendered” crime.

I have written numerous times about female sex offenders. While the topic receives less media and scholarly attention, there are plenty of studies showing the prevalence of female sexual perpetration. I previously noted that if one looks at these studies in chronological order, the reported rate of female perpetration, particularly against male victims, increases over time. The more we study the topic, the more obvious it becomes that not only do women commit sexual violence, but that they represent the majority of people who sexually assault men and boys.

As shown above, none of this information is new. I pieced it together without access to scholarly publications. Other advocates, men’s rights activists, and even feminists have done the same. The information is scattered and somewhat limited, yet it is not hard to find.

It is simply not discussed. Continue reading