Man walks free hours after admitting rape of young boy

When I typically write about cases of sex offenders walking out of court with no jail time, the offender is female. She usually gets a pass for some asinine reason related to her sex, looks, social status, parental status, mental state, childhood, or general health. This time it is the offender is a man, although the reason for his release is just as ridiculous:

The 23-year-old man, who cannot be named to protect the victim, pleaded guilty on Wednesday in Brisbane District Court to three counts of rape, five counts of indecent treatment of a child and two counts of failure to comply with court-ordered reporting requirements.

[…]

Judge Terry Martin sentenced the man to 12 months jail suspended for 18 months for the rapes and an 18-month probation order for the remaining sex offences and a fine of $150 for the compliance breaches.

He will serve 50 hours community service.

The unemployed man was 15 or 16 when he abused the victim in 2008 or 2009.

The victim was four to five years old at the time of the offences.

In short, this was a first-time offense for something the man did as a minor. That would explain the 12-month jail sentence, yet it does not why the man was allowed to walk. It is particularly bizarre considering why this case even reached the court: Continue reading

Rethinking juvenile justice

One of my pet peeves is the way we treat children who commit crimes. For some reason, we treat them more harshly than we do adults. We feel compelled sentence them to long sentences, long mandatory minimums, and sentences with no possibility of parole. We like to charge them as adults, the younger the better, and inexplicably place children in prison with adults.

More bizarre is that we allow this to occur despite knowing what could happen to these kids. It makes no sense for us to charge 8-year-olds as adults. It makes no sense for us to imprison a 14-year-old to life without the possibility of parole. It makes even less sense to lock them in solitary confinement or sentence them to death.

The latter the Supreme Court addressed several years ago. They banned juvenile executions in 2005. However, life without parole still remained in place. Now they have struck that down as well, and made the ban retroactive: Continue reading

SNL thinks “hot teacher sex” is funny

As readers of his blog will know, child rape is hilarious. Anytime an adult takes advantage of their authority, trust, and power to sexually exploit a child it is the height of humor. Indeed, the older the child, the funnier the assault because we all know teens always want sex with smoking hot adults. It is not as if it is a complete betrayal or taking advantage of the less experienced party. No, the scenario is hysterical, unless the child is a girl, in which case no comedy show would make a sketch mocking the idea of charging two adults for having sex with a 16-year-old.

Fortunately, Saturday Night Live had the forethought and maturity to mock the idea of charging two women with raping a 16-year-old boy, hence last Saturday’s sketch titled Teacher Trial with Rhonda Rousey:

The humor practically writes itself. Continue reading

Bulletin Board v283

Canonbury sex offence man jailed for 13 years after abusing his position of trust — Leslie Paul, 64, of Clephane Road, was sentenced at Blackfriars Crown Court for offences of indecent assault and indecency while working as a carer for Lambeth Social Services. Between 1980 and 1988, Paul carried out the offences at Lambeth Children’s Home in South Vale, where the four male victims resided. In October 2012, the first victim came forward to report allegations against Paul.

Case begins in trial of woman suspected of young son’s sexual abuse — The trial of a woman suspected of having sex with her adopted son began Friday with the prosecutor telling jurors the case is about a 12-year-old boy and the events he would describe, and a defense lawyer saying her client is the victim of threats by her boyfriend and that the woman never had sex with the boy. Deputy District Attorney Mary Nguyen during her opening statement in Solano County Superior Court told jurors Friday that defendant Michelle V. Souza had intercourse with her adopted son, now 12, and instructed him not to tell anybody.

Domestic abuse: Men ‘need more help’, victims’ organisation says — The Men’s Advisory Project said it supported 536 clients in 2015 compared to 294 in 2013. But while victims often suffer similar hardship, it said the services available for men in Northern Ireland are less extensive than for women. One man who knows how difficult it can be to get help is Paul. Paul, whose name has been changed to protect his identity, walked away from his 25-year marriage after suffering physical, emotional and psychological abuse. Continue reading

Aftermath of the Cologne New Years Eve Attacks

Sargon of Akkad uploaded a video about the Cologne New Year’s Eve attacks in Germany. On New Year’s Eve, thousands of Muslim men took to the streets and physically and sexually assaulted scores of people. This occurred in several cities, but the main focus has been Cologne due to the number of reported assaults and the following cover-up.

It is the latter that has proven most curious because not only did the authorities attempt to hide what happened, but the progressive media also attempted to mislead people about the identity of the assailants and the nature of the assaults.

The reason for the cover-up is that the majority of men who committed the violence appear to be migrants and refugees from Middle East and North African Muslim-based countries. Tthe Germany authorities do not want to admit this and decided to mask the identities of the assailants as best they could, lest anyone (i.e. the progressive left) accuse them of “racism” despite Islam not being a race. Continue reading

Confronting the stigmas of male victimization

A recent article on Sheknows tackled the issue of the stigmas male domestic violence victims face. Author Cailyn Cox noted:

When we hear of a female victim of domestic abuse, we are sickened, horrified and angry, but is the reaction the same when the victim is male?

More than 700,000 men a year are believed to fall victim to violent attacks from their partners, but according to The Telegraph, many of these acts go unreported, as men fear the consequences of reporting the offence.

Such consequences include shame and embarrassment, which stem from the stigma attached to the abuse, as well as fear that they themselves may be arrested after their abusers make false accusations in retaliation.

Dr Jessica McCarrick, a senior lecturer in counselling psychology at Teesside University, carried out a study on male domestic violence victims, and her report revealed that men were often “treated with suspicion by the criminal justice system” — the very system they are meant to be relying on for protection.

Wherever would they get such a notion? Surely no country, such as Australia for example, would have it written into their general policy to treat male victims of domestic violence as abusers until proven otherwise: Continue reading

Matthew Santoro: My Abuse Story

I thought I would share Matthew Santoro’s video about his abuse at the hands of an ex-girlfriend. It takes Santoro some time before he is able to describe what happened to him. I have seen that before with many abused men. They are not used to talking about it, and quite often all the emotions rush forward at once.

The video has made the rounds on the internet, and I hope that more comes from it than people merely listening to him speak and saying how sorry they feel for him. People should listen to what he says about how this woman abused him. Listen to the ways in which his abuser worked. Listen to how she manipulated him and others. Listen to how she used the situation and her sex to her advantage.

These are things that male victims face. These are the things that keep many men from coming forward. Part of what makes Santoro’s story so powerful is that you can see his face. You can see the affect the abuse had on him. The visual makes it harder to dismiss him.

We need to understand that domestic violence is not about male oppression of females, but about one person controlling another. It knows no sex. It is purely about power through fear.

Please take the time to listen to Santoro’s story. Continue reading